Should I Buy Out My Lease?

Q: My lease agreement is nearing its end, and I’m getting many offers to buy out my lease due to the current state of the economy. Should I ignore the hype, or is it really a good idea to buy out my lease?

A: With cars in hot demand, and selling at all-time high prices, many lease customers are looking at trade-in values for their vehicles with the intention of buying out their lease. While this can be a smart choice for many consumers, it’s important to consider all relevant factors before making a decision. Here’s what you need to know about buying out your lease.

What is a lease buyout?

Many drivers are confused by the offers they’re getting and the promotions they’ve seen for buying out leases. How is it possible to buy a lease when a leased vehicle, by definition, is essentially a rented car?

First, buying out a lease involves paying the car’s “buyout price” as specified in the lease contract, which makes you the car’s new owner. Second, it’s important to establish that buying out a lease generally makes the most sense when you are nearing the end of your lease term.   Finally, this may necessitate taking out an auto loan to afford the buyout price, just like you might do when purchasing a new or used car at a dealership.  

How can I determine my car’s buyout price?

To estimate how much you’d need to pay to buy your leased car, look for the term “residual value” in your lease contract. This tells you what your leased vehicle is expected to be worth at the end of the term, which may be months or years away. To reach your vehicle’s buyout price, add the residual value to any remaining payments. For example, if your car’s residual value is $25,000 and you owe another 10 payments of $500, the car’s buyout price is $30,000. Of course, the more time left on your lease, the higher price you can expect to pay to buyout.

Will I need to pay any fees in addition to the buyout price?

Depending on your home state, your vehicle’s buyout price may be subject to an auto sales tax. Your lender may also charge additional fees, such as a ‘purchase option fee’. It’s important to know about any additional fees you may need to pay in addition to the buyout price and to 

estimate the total you’ll be paying before deciding to purchase a leased car.

The good news is that you won’t be accountable for the typical lease-end fees, which can include the costs of reconditioning the vehicle for resale, fixing any damage the car may have incurred during your term, and an over-mileage penalty for every mile you may have driven over the official limit.  

What are the advantages of buying out a lease?

Many drivers are opting to buy their leased vehicles now due to the current state of the auto industry. Supply is low and both new and used cars are in high demand. A driver nearing the end of their lease agreement may find it challenging to purchase or lease another car. Buying a car you already lease will give you first dibs at a hot commodity.  

Some drivers are choosing to capitalize on the high demand for used cars by buying out their leases and then flipping the car to a dealership or selling it privately to a new owner. They assume they will earn enough from the sale to help offset the price of a new car. While this may be true, it’s important to remember that it may be difficult to find a new car in a desired model and at an affordable price.

Before taking out a loan to buy out a lease, find out what your car is actually worth. Due to the state of the market, it’s likely worth more than you’ll pay. However, if it’s worth less than the buyout price, you’ll be upside-down on your loan, which is never a good idea. In addition, you may find it difficult to qualify for a loan in an amount that is higher than the value of the asset.  

How do I buy out my lease?

If you decide to go ahead and buy out your lease, you’ll first need to run the numbers as described above to be sure it’s a financially responsible decision. When you have the total buyout price, your next step is to work on financing. You can choose to take out an auto loan or a personal loan to help cover the costs. 

Next, you’ll contact the company behind your lease and complete the purchase. The sale process will be similar to the sale of any car. Finally, be sure to notify your insurance company about the change in ownership of your vehicle. Leases generally require plans with low deductibles and high premiums, so you may want to choose a new plan with higher deductibles and lower monthly premiums.

If you’re looking to finance an auto loan for a lease buyout car, look no further than Advantage One Credit Union! Our auto loans offer low interest rates [see for current rates], easy payback terms and a quick approval process. Call, click or stop by to get started or discuss available options!

Your Turn: Have you bought your leased car? Tell us about your experience in the comments. 

Should I Buy or Lease a Car Now?

Q: It’s no secret that the semiconductor chip shortage is driving up the price of both new and used cars, but I do need a new set of wheels. Am I better off buying or leasing a car now? 

A: The chip shortage and other factors relating to the pandemic and inflation have created a tight auto loan market, the likes of which haven’t been seen in years. 

As a result, finding a new or used car that meets your criteria is challenging in today’s market. Unfortunately, though, leases have also risen in price and there is limited availability among many models. 

If you need a new car right now, what’s your best choice? 

Let’s take a deeper look at buying and leasing a car, paying particular attention to factors that are unique to today’s market, to help you determine which option makes the most sense for you. 

Buying a car in 2021

If you choose to buy a new or used car, you’re looking at inflated prices and a supply shortage that’s been ongoing for months. Expect to pay approximately $40,000 for a new car and $23,000 for a used car, according to Edmunds.com. You’re also unlikely to get the service you may be used to getting at a dealership since salespeople likely have more customers than they can serve at present. This can translate into reluctance to move on the sticker price and in a delayed processing of a car purchase. 

Leasing a car in 2021

The leasing market has not been spared the after-effects of the chip shortage and resultant lag in supply of new vehicles. Many lease companies are struggling to service customers while facing a shortage in available cars. The rising prices have hit this market, too. 

If you’re nearing the end of a lease, you may be in luck. Auto dealerships are in desperate need of cars to sell, and they may offer to buy out your lease at an inflated price, leaving you with extra cash to finance your next car. The dealer pays the leasing company what you owe, and gives you a check for the remaining equity. Of course, you’ll also be facing high prices, but it may be worth getting a head-start on your purchase. 

Buying VS. leasing

In every market, there are some drivers who are better suited toward owning a car and others who benefit more from leasing. Here are some important factors to consider when making this decision: 

  • How long do you hold onto your cars? If you like to swap in your cars for a newer model every few years, a lease may be a better fit for your lifestyle. On the flip side, if you tend to hold onto your cars for many years, consider buying a car instead. 
  • Insurance costs. Leases require full insurance coverage, which can be pricey. When you own your vehicle, though, the amount of insurance coverage beyond what is required by law is your decision. If you like having full protection, including GAP insurance, which pays the difference between what you owe on a car and its true value if it’s totaled in an accident or stolen, a lease may be a better choice for you. If, however, you tend to purchase just minimum coverage, you may be better off purchasing your vehicle. 
  • Mileage. If you usually put more than 10,000 miles on your car each year (the standard amount allowed by most leasing companies before charging extra), you may be better off buying a car. Keep in mind, though, that you’ll still need to pay for those miles in depreciation costs of the car. 
  • Maintenance costs. When you lease a car, most maintenance costs are on the leasing company. You’ll need to spring for anything related to wear and tear of the vehicle, but most other repairs will be covered. You’ll also have the option to pay extra for tire protection, and dent and scratch insurance. 

When you own your car, you’ll be footing the bill for all these costs, plus any maintenance needs. To minimize these costs, don’t finalize a car purchase without first ensuring it’s in good working order. You can do this by using its VIN (vehicle identification number) to look up its history and by having it professionally inspected by a mechanic.

While individual circumstances vary, in general, you can expect the cost of purchasing and leasing a vehicle to break even at the three-year mark. While a lease may offer you cheaper monthly payments, you’ll likely earn back two-thirds of the price you paid on a car if you sell it after three years. 

Today’s auto loan market makes every decision challenging. If you’re choosing between buying or leasing a car, be sure to weigh all variables carefully before making your decision. 

Your Turn: Do you buy or lease your cars? Which factors drive that decision? Tell us about it in the comments. 

Step-by-Step Guide for Buying a Motorcycle

If you’re ready to purchase your first motorcycle, you’re likely thrilled — and more than a little overwhelmed. There are so many factors to consider and dozens of choices you’ll need to make before you pull the clutch. It can all get confusing, fast!

No worries; Advantage One Credit Union is here to help. We’ve compiled a step-by-step guide for buying a motorcycle, complete with useful tips to help you make a purchase you’ll enjoy for years to come. 

Secure financing

A motorcycle can run you anywhere from $2,000 to $16,000, and it’s always best to have the financial details of a large purchase squared away before entering the market so you’ll avoid disappointment later. You can save up for your bike, charge it to a low-interest credit card or take out an unsecured loan from Advantage One Credit Union, where you’ll enjoy affordable interest rates and payback terms to fit your budget. 

Brush up on your motorcycle safety

Before you shop for a bike, it’s a good idea to complete a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course. The course is similar to driver’s training and will help ensure you can ride your bike with increased safety. Depending on your state, you may need to obtain a special motorcycle license as well. 

Procure insurance

In some states, motorcycle insurance is required by law, but even if your state does not mandate it, consider purchasing coverage anyway. Insurance will protect you from liability for property damage or personal injuries caused through your vehicle, help cover medical bills in case of an accident, and cover theft and damage to your bike as well. As is the case with auto insurance, you’ll have the freedom to choose how much coverage you’d like to purchase, with more robust coverage directly increasing the cost of your policy. 

Choose between a new and used bike

You’ve got the important stuff taken care of and you’re itching to try out bikes, but before you do, decide if you’re going to purchase a new or used motorcycle. Let’s take a quick look at the pros and cons of each option. 

A used motorcycle can cost thousands less than a new bike and won’t depreciate nearly as much, but finding a used motorcycle in decent condition can be challenging. If you decide to go this route, stay away from bikes that show signs of excessive wear, have mileage exceeding 20,000 miles, and/or have difficulty starting up, running or stopping. It’s also a good idea to get a VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) to check on your potential new bike, have it professionally inspected, and take it for a spin before finalizing the deal. 

A new bike will be blessedly free of mechanical breakdowns in the near future and will look nice and shiny. Of course, you’ll pay for these privileges, so be sure to run the numbers before setting your heart on a particular motorcycle. It’s also important to note that, while you might save on repairs and maintenance, insurance on a new bike will likely be a lot more expensive than coverage for a used one.

Choose a motorcycle type

You’re ready to choose your type of ride. Here are the most popular choices:

  • Sport bikes- equipped with a leaning design that makes them ideal for riding at high speeds, these bikes also have higher foot-pegs and handlebars that are more out of reach than most other bikes. A sport bike can be a good choice for thrill-seekers, but an uncomfortable option for riders planning to take long trips on their bikes. Insurance can also be expensive. 
  • Standard bikes-an upright riding posture and lack of accessories make these a great all-purpose motorcycle. Perfect for beginners and the budget-conscious, but not the best choice for off-road and long-distance riders. 
  • Cruisers-the Harley Davidson standard, cruisers offer a relaxed riding position, comfortable suspension and a V-twin engine. They also tend to be heavy, making them difficult for new or small riders to handle, but an excellent choice for tall riders and those seeking a stylish ride. 
  • Touring bikes-built for long rides, these motorcycles are fully loaded with extra features, including fairings that block the wind, saddlebags to accommodate luggage and large fuel tanks for long trips. A touring bike can be ideal for riders who take lots of road trips, but they can be an expensive choice for city riders. 
  • Dual sport bikes-lightweight and built with high-travel suspension and aggressive tires, these bikes are a great choice for off-road riding. Their tall seat height makes them difficult for short riders to handle.

Once you’ve chosen your ride type, research models from popular brands, including Yamaha, Harley Davidson, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Honda and Triumph. Be sure to check out ratings and reviews from current owners. Once you’ve narrowed down your choice, you’re ready to visit dealerships and private sellers.

Important features to consider

A motorcycle’s seat, handlebars and foot-pegs are not adjustable, so it’s important to choose one that fits comfortably. Take a seat on any bike you are considering. See how it feels, and make sure you can easily reach the handlebars and pedals. If possible, go for a ride around town to get a real feel for it. 

You’ll also want to consider the weight of your bike since a heavier bike can be difficult to maneuver. 

Finally, if you’re a new rider, don’t go overboard on power. It’s best to start with a bike that has a 500cc engine and then trade- in for something more powerful later on, if necessary. 

Choose your bike and finalize your purchase

You’re ready to buy your bike! Be sure to choose carefully and do lots of research so you’ll enjoy your motorcycle for many happy miles. 

Your Turn: Have you recently purchased a motorcycle? Share your tips and advice with us in the comments. 

Common Auto Financing Terms

Defining the essential vehicle finance jargon you should know
Calculator with car keys on top of keypadPurchasing a vehicle from a dealership, be it a brand new or moderately used model, is rarely as simple as you would hope. What should be a basic transaction can quickly become a complicated discussion rife with uncommon phrases you wouldn’t hear elsewhere.

In preparation for the next time you intend to shake hands and sign on the dotted line to purchase a car, familiarize yourself with the following information.

Understanding pricing
Even before you step foot on a car lot and introduce yourself to a sales representative, it is crucial that you understand how each vehicle is given a price. If you’re researching vehicle prices, you will likely come across these terms.

The manufacturer’s suggested retail price of a vehicle (MSRP), also known as list price, is the manufacturer’s recommended price at which to sell a brand new vehicle. It’s not required that a dealer adhere to this amount, but according to the experts at Bankrate.com, it is required by law to be posted on the vehicle window’s Monroney sticker, along with the destination (freight/shipping) charge.

This differs from the invoice price, which is the amount the manufacturer initially charges the dealership to obtain and, in turn, sell the car to a buyer. The invoice price can be lowered by rebates, incentives, holdbacks and other ways to ensure the dealer makes a profit.

According to the DMV.org’s guide to understanding car financing, incentives and rebates can also be offered to retail customers looking to purchase the vehicle. The dealer may launch a short-term program to offer financial enticement to buyers in order to sell certain models. Manufacturers can also temporarily reduce the price of a model in a rebate program to make the cost accessible to more buyers.

Understanding financing
Once you negotiate and agree upon a fair price for the vehicle, the process moves to financing the purchase. Since most people don’t pay the entire bill up front, the transaction will be financed, distributing the cost across multiple years to be paid back with interest in monthly installments.

The Federal Trade Commission’s Consumer Information guide explains that the annual percentage rate (APR) measures how much the loan will cost the buyer and expresses it as a negotiable percentage. The APR includes not only the basic interest rate but also other fees involved with making a loan. The APR can be affected by many factors, from your credit history to local competition among dealerships. If you have poor credit history, based on an inconsistency of bill payment and financial dependability, you may be deemed a non-prime lender and receive a higher rate.

Interest rates can either be fixed, remaining the same throughout the entire repayment term, or are variable and fluctuate based on the current index.

Once you pay the initial down payment on the vehicle, the remaining balance will be financed and will consist of the principal, the amount of the vehicle cost still owed, the interest charges and any other fees.

Understanding your future
Ideally, you will continue to make monthly payments until you repay your auto loan on time. If you happen to pay it off early, Bankrate.com experts warn that you might be charged a prepayment penalty by the dealer, so inquire beforehand.

If, down the road, you believe you could get a better deal on the loan than you currently have, you can refinance the loan, either with the current lender at a new rate or with a different lender. Refinancing allows your loan to be reevaluated and potentially adjusted to a better rate.

According to DMV.org, there are two things you don’t want to have happen to your new car: be upside-down or have it repossessed. If you are upside down or underwater on a loan, the vehicle has negative equity and you owe more on it than it is worth. If you fail to make your payments on the vehicle, your lender might repossess your car, taking the vehicle from you without warning or court involvement.

Hopefully by understanding how the auto financing process works and what these common phrases mean, you can avoid any penalties or pitfalls and purchase your next car without issue.

Used with Permission. Published by IMN Bank Adviser Includes copyrighted material of IMakeNews, Inc. and its suppliers.