Thriving in a Multi-generational Workplace

Whether you’re the “old guy” at #work or working with a bunch of older employees, you can all learn to get along and do great things. Read our tips for how to handle a mixed #workplace!

Gone are the days when you got a job out of high school or college and then worked there for 40 years, got a party and gold watch before living off your pension and IRA.

Whether it’s for financial reasons or to fulfill a desire to remain productive and useful, workers are remaining employed way past traditional retirement age. According to Business Insider.com U.S. census statistics report that, as of February 2019, about 20% of Americans over age 65 — a total of 10.6 million people — were either working or looking for work.

This resulted in today’s multi-generational workplace, which brings with it conflicts from work ethic to technological know-how.

Here’s how older workers can face the workday feeling like an integral part of their team:

Break down generational stereotypes. Understanding other age groups’ work styles leads to respectful attitudes. Working on a project with a younger co-worker can integrate varied viewpoints, and often produces innovative ideas.

Learn from each other. While older workers can pass along their years of knowledge and experience as well as business contacts, younger workers can share their experience with the latest tech and social media channels.

Fill in communication gaps. Let your manager know if you are not comfortable with the method of communication in the office. Unless it is mandatory that workers use the company email or messaging system, let your manager know your preferred communication methods.

Respect each other. In creating a harmonious work environment, it all comes down to mutual respect. The key to establishing respect among generations is knowing that your co-workers’ motivation, work style and experience is different than yours. It also helps to be flexible and accommodate their needs and preferences.

It takes effort on everyone’s part to create balance in a multi-generational workplace. Teamwork makes the dream work!

Your turn: What’s your experience working in a multi-generational workplace? Tell us about it in the comments.

Learn More:
businessinsider.com
kellyservices.us
investopedia.com
mindtools.com

4 Steps to Choosing and Securing Job References

two people discuss a list of references at a conference tableAs you work on perfecting your resume and portfolio for the best shot at landing that post-college dream job, think about who you’ll list as your job references.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this step. According to a survey by CareerBuilder, nearly 70 percent of employers have changed their mind about a possible job candidate because of the input shared by a reference. Make sure you choose yours well and follow these tips for ensuring they give you a glowing report.

You can list any of the following people as a job reference:

  • Former employers
  • Extracurricular activity advisers
  • College administrators
  • College professors
  • Professional acquaintances

Here are four steps to ensure the best recommendation possible:

Step 1: Ask for permission
Don’t list a college professor, former employer or anyone else as a job reference before asking their permission. Your reference may prefer not to be listed. It’s also respectful to ask their permission before including their name on an application.

Step 2: Collect important details about the reference
While asking for permission to list a reference, verify their contact information and details. You’ll need the full name of each reference you list, as well as their official title, phone number, email and mailing address.

Step 3: Prepare your references
It’s best to share your employment goals and the particulars of your job search with your references. Tell them about the specific skills you hope to use in your future job, important projects you’ve worked on in the past and anything else that might be helpful for them to know. Provide each reference with a copy of your resume to make it easier for them to remember your personal details.

Step 4: Keep your references updated during your job search
Let your references know when you’ve just applied for a job so they’re prepared for a phone call or email from your potential employer. They will be more likely to give you a positive reference when they know to expect an inquiry about you. It’s also respectful for you to share with them when you’ve landed a job and to thank them for their assistance in the process.

Your Turn:
What tips can you share about job references?

Learn More:
glassdoor.com
collegegrad.com
glassdoor.com

What To Look For In Your First Job

Hand using brush and ink to write job descriptionIf you’re – finally! – in the middle of your last year at college, you likely spend lots of time thinking about that first, after-college job.

What will your job be like?

What kind of company will you work for?

How big will your starting salary be?

Will you get along with your co-workers?

There are so many variables to think about when looking for that first job! Whether you’ve already started haunting job boards and sending out resumes or you haven’t taken the first step, we’ve got you covered. Read on for a list of the most important factors to consider when looking for your post-college job:

1.) Room for growth
You’re at the starting point of your earning potential and can’t be too hung up on salary. A respectable paycheck is nice and you definitely shouldn’t be working for pennies, but it’s more important to consider whether a position will offer you room for growth. After all, you don’t want the first few years of your career path to be stagnant.

2.) Exposure to new skills and knowledge
Experience is truly the best teacher. When looking for a job, be sure to choose one that will help you acquire new skills and broaden your knowledge base. This way, even if the job doesn’t end up being a keeper, you’ll be more marketable for future positions.

3.) Varied responsibilities
A first job will not necessarily match your skill set. You might find yourself being asked to assume responsibilities you’d never thought you could handle. Instead of stressing about this possibility, if it comes up at an interview, look at it as a positive factor.

You still don’t know the extent of your capabilities. The opportunity to explore new tasks will help you tap into your true potential.

4.) Benefits
When considering your take-home pay, find out which – if any – benefits are offered. Standard employee benefits include health insurance, a 401K, paid time off and sick leave. Accepting a job with a higher salary but no benefits can actually leave you with less money in your checking account at the end of the month.

5.) Company history
No matter how exciting a position sounds, it’s crucial to find out all you can about the company itself. How long has the company been in business? Is there a high turnover among employees? Have they recently gone through a management shakeup?

While you might be drawn to a young startup that promises tremendous room for advancement, a well-established company with a proven success track is less chancy and offers more stability.

6.) Don’t expect perfection
You likely have a list of everything that’s important to you in a job. Lots of these factors may be important, and you might even consider them deal-breakers at a prospective job.

It’s important to remember, though, that no job is perfect. You certainly won’t find perfection at your first real job! Scan your list to determine what is truly a non-negotiable to you and what you would consider dropping if everything else fits well.

Your Turn:
Are you job-hunting now? What are your deal-breakers? Share your tips and thoughts with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/what-to-look-for-in-a-first-job
https://www.google.com/search?q=what+to+look+for+first+job&rlz=1CDGOYI_enUS753US753&oq=wha&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j69i60j69i57j69i61l2j0.3944j0j4&hl=en-US&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8
http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/worklife/06/25/cb.first.job/