Have it All: The Roadmap to Becoming a Self-Made Millionaire

Title: Have it All: The Roadmap to Becoming a Self-Made Millionaire

Author: Kris Krohn

Print length: 316 pages

Kindle file size: ‎ 4709 KB

Publisher: Uplife Press

Publishing date: Dec. 9, 2021

Who is this book for? 

  • Anyone looking to change the way they relate to money. 
  • Anyone looking for practical investment advice.

What’s inside this book?

  • Actionable tips for improving your financial reality.
  • A step-by-step guide for financial success. 

4 lessons you’ll learn from this book:  

  1. How to outsmart the old money rules and follow the new ones. 
  2. How to achieve true financial freedom. 
  3. How to create active, passive and positive asymmetric risk.
  4. How to find profitable Returns on Investment (ROIs).

4 questions this book will answer for you:  

  1. How can I unlearn all that society has taught me about money management? 
  2. What do I need to know to be a savvy investor?
  3. Can I really enjoy my life despite having limited financial opportunities?
  4. Can I improve my finances without a large windfall?

What people are saying about this book: 

  • “Kris goes into depth on different topics to cover everything from real estate to stocks and how to start building a financial portfolio and live a better life!”
  • “Insightful, motivational and really inspiring!”
  • “This book gave me the hope and encouragement I needed, that yes, I can have it all. I love how Mr. Kris Krohn tells us exactly how we need to break those limiting beliefs and allow ourselves to enjoy life to the fullest. This book is so relatable and inspiring.”
  • “If you’re trying to figure out how to become financially free and where to start, then this is the book for you. This is the book that will set you on the next level of your life and get you ready for financial freedom in three to five years!”

Your Turn: What did you think of Have it All? Share your opinion in the comments. 

Should I Offer Financial Support to my Adult Child?

Q: My adult child is going through some financial difficulties. I’d love to help them out of this tight spot, but I’m wondering if this is a wise choice. Should I offer financial support to my adult child?

A: In recent years, newly minted adults have become more dependent on their parents. According to a report by Merrill, more than three-quarters of parents in the U.S. provide financial support to their adult children. This includes allowing their kids to live at home, covering student loan bills, paying for their phone/data plans and more. This development is likely due to high amounts of student loan debt, low starting salaries and the increasing cost of housing. All of these factors, and more, make finances especially challenging for many young adults. Of course, parents will naturally want what’s best for their children, so they are often quick to offer financial assistance. 

However, as you mention, all this begs the question: Is offering financial assistance to adult children really in their best interest? 

There’s no one-size-fits-all answer to this loaded question. In fact, the answer will depend on several factors, as well as your relationship with your child. Before saying yes to a request for financial support from an adult child, ask yourself these questions: 

Is my own financial situation stable right now? 

Before offering substantial support to another person, even if that person is your child, you need to make sure your own needs are being met and that your future is secure. Are you finishing the month with money to spare, or barely making it to the next payday? Are you financially prepared for retirement? Do you have any outstanding debt? 

If you are comfortable enough to offer support without feeling pinched, dipping into savings or scrimping on the money you’d dedicate toward your own future security, you can afford to offer this assistance. However, if you stand to lose your own financial wellness by covering your child’s bills or student loan payments, you won’t be doing anyone a favor by offering to support your child.

Is my child’s situation by default temporary? 

Life is dynamic, which means your child’s need for assistance today can change tomorrow by way of a fantastic job offer or another great opportunity. 

Or can it?

At times, your adult kid might find themselves in a tight spot that is inherently temporary. For example, they may be completing a necessary, but unpaid, internship. Or, they may have gone back to school for additional training so they can increase their earning potential. Perhaps they’re currently undergoing medical treatment and have high medical bills to pay. Under these circumstances, you may want to consider offering a bit of support until the temporary tight spot is over. 

If, however, your child is asking for financial support because they are living a lifestyle that is beyond their means, you may want to think twice before acquiescing to their request. 

Will offering financial support hinder my child’s financial independence?

One of the biggest drawbacks of offering monetary assistance to a grown child is the possibility that your child will come to depend on that money. If your child has not yet learned to manage their finances responsibly and continues to make poor money choices, offering financial assistance is likely not in their best interest. You won’t be around forever, and it’s best to let your child learn how to spend within their budget, save for the future and in general, to live responsibly. 

How will my financial support affect my relationship with this child?

Giving breeds positive feelings, and many people believe that offering monetary support to their child will improve their relationship with him or her. However, it’s important to note that this is not always the case. First, the child may come to equate the relationship with the exchange of funds. Also, when you decide to stop offering support, this can create a point of tension between you and your child. Finally, if you can afford to give, but you know this giving will be accompanied by resentment on your part, it’s not fair to yourself, or to your child, to provide financial support. 

How will I structure my financial support?

If you decide to go ahead and offer financial support to your child, it’s important to set clear guidelines for how you will be providing this assistance. Will you offer a set monthly amount, or adopt a give-as-needed approach? Will you expect your child to pay you back, even partially, when their financial situation improves? Finally, is there a date you plan to stop offering assistance or to reevaluate whether your child still needs this support? 

Setting clear parameters before offering support can help you avoid hurt feelings and uncomfortable situations down the line. 

Offering financial support to an adult child can be a lifeline–or it can be a way to enable detrimental habits. Be sure to ask yourself the questions listed above and to make an informed decision before offering monetary assistance to a grown child. 

Your Turn: Do you, or would you, offer financial support to your adult child(ren)? Tell us about it in the comments. 

Money Magic: An Economist’s Secrets to More Money, Less Risk, and a Better

Title: Money Magic: An Economist’s Secrets to More Money, Less Risk, and a Better Life 

Author: Laurence Kotlikoff

Hardcover: 320 pages

Publisher: Little, Brown Spark

Publishing date: Jan. 4, 2022

Who is this book for? 

  • Anyone struggling with making financial choices
  • Readers of any age or stage who are looking for the magic path toward financial independence 

What’s inside this book?

  • A framework for a happier and safer financial life 
  • Practical tips for enhancing your standard of living and achieving financial independence 
  • Spellbinding money tricks culled from economic research 

4 lessons you’ll learn from this book:  

  1. How to transform your financial thinking
  2. How to choose a career that will enable you to maximize your lifetime earnings
  3. How to buy a superior education for less and graduate debt-free
  4. Why you may want to cash out your IRA to pay off your mortgage

4 questions this book will answer for you:  

  1. What are the financial ramifications of delaying retirement?
  2. How can I lower my average lifetime tax bracket? 
  3. Does financial planning need to be a tiresome chore?
  4. How can economics and advanced computation help me improve my financial health?

What people are saying about this book: 

“Fact-filled, wisdom-filled, Money Magic is quite probably the best financial advice book ever written.  You can read it for Laurence Kotlikoff’s sage advice, which tells how to manage your finances for a happier, better life.  You can also read it for fun: there is a laugh on almost every page.  You should read it for both.” ―George Akerlof

“Money Magic is a delightful book. With wit and wisdom, Kotlikoff delivers rich economic insights, concrete advice, and hard-nosed, yet soft-hearted guidance on financial planning, all well-grounded in the science of finance.  It will change your financial thinking and improve your financial life. Wherever in the lifecycle, beginning student to beginning retiree, the reader is in for a treat: Bon Appetit!” ―Robert C Merton 

“Full of invaluable guidance, this is a must-read for anyone concerned about their financial future.”―Publisher Weekly

“The best personal finance book you’ll read this year.” ―Terry Savage

“Laurence Kotlikoff, the provocative Boston University economics professor and Social Security expert, has written an excellent new book, Money Magic: An Economist’s Secrets to More Money, Less Risk, and a Better Life In it, he offers counterintuitive and surprising personal finance tips regardless of your age.”―Kerry Hannon

Your Turn: What did you think of Money Magic? Share your opinion in the comments. 

Step 2 of 12 to Financial Wellness: Creating a Budget

Now that you’ve tracked your spending and kept a careful record of where your money goes over the course of a month, you’re ready to move onto the next step of financial wellness: creating a budget. Budgets play a crucial role in promoting financial awareness, which then helps to facilitate more responsible money choices. This discipline will benefit you individually, as well as all who are part of your household. 

Let’s get started by taking a look at how to create a budget and review some popular budgeting systems and how they work. . 

Create a budget in 5 easy steps

  • Track your spending and income. This includes all your financial documents, such as your account statements, bills and pay stubs. [If you’ve followed Step 1, you’ve already completed this step–nice work getting ahead of the game!]
  • Tally up your totals. Calculate the totals of your monthly expenses and all your streams of income. If your income exceeds your expenses, you’re in a good place. However, if your expenses exceed your income, or the numbers are too close for comfort, you’ll need to trim some discretionary expenses to make it through the month without falling into debt if an unforeseen big expense happens. 
  • List your needs. Your needs include anything that is essential for living and basic functions, such as rent or mortgage payments, savings, food and clothing. Needs always take priority in a budget. As you list each need, write down its corresponding cost. Sum up the total of your needs when you’ve finished. 
  • List your wants. This includes anything that is not essential for living, like entertainment costs, brand-name clothing and eating out. Here, too, note the monthly cost of each item on your list and add up the total when you’re done. 
  • Assign dollar amounts to your expenses. Open a new spreadsheet and copy your list of expenses, starting with fixed-cost needs, then non fixed-cost needs, and finally, your wants. Assign an appropriate dollar amount for each of these costs, making sure the total does not exceed your estimated total for monthly expenses. 
  • Review and tweak as necessary. You will likely need to adjust the amounts in each expense category at least once a year to keep your budget relevant. Likewise, you will hopefully be able to increase the amounts in the income column as you move upward in your career path or find additional income streams. 

Budgeting systems

While every kind of budget involves tracking expenses and committing to a maximum spending amount each month, there is a wide range of budgeting systems to fit every kind of personality and money management style. 

The traditional budget doesn’t involve much more work than the steps described above. After working out a number for every expense category, you’ll simply need to track your spending throughout the month to ensure you’re sticking to the plan. You can use a spreadsheet for this purpose, or utilize one of the popular budgeting apps, like Mint or YNAB, and do it digitally. 

The money-envelope system works similarly. However, instead of simply committing to sticking to your spending amounts for each expense category, you’ll withdraw the amount you plan to spend on all non-fixed expenses in cash at the start of the month. Divide the cash into separate envelopes, using one for each of these expenses. Then, withdraw cash from the appropriate envelope when making a purchase in that category. There’s no way to blow your budget with this system; when the money in the “Dining out” envelope runs dry, that’s all for this month!

The 50/30/20 budget is simpler, but requires more discipline. Set aside 50 percent of your budget for your needs, 30 percent for wants and the remaining 20 percent for savings. Of course, you’ll need to make sure your income and expenses will work with this kind of budget. Does 50 percent of your income cover your needs? If yes, this budget allows for more individual choices each month and less accounting and tracking of expenses. 

A well-designed budget can provide its creator with a sense of financial security and freedom. When you stick to a budget, you’ll always know you have enough to get through the month and save for the future. Start budgeting today!

Your Turn: Do you stick to a strict monthly budget? Share your best budgeting tips with us in the comments. 

Which Financial Steps Should I Take After a Divorce?

Q: I’m going through a divorce, and one of my biggest stressors is identifying how I’m going to deal with my finances on my own. What steps do I need to take to ensure ongoing financial stability after a divorce?

A: Divorce can be difficult on many levels, and one of the most formidable challenges for most is the financial strain it causes. Making sense of your finances after a divorce takes work and time, but with proper planning and a responsible approach, it can be done. 

Here are 10 financial steps to take after a divorce:

1. Close all joint accounts

If you haven’t already taken this step, do so immediately. Review all your financial accounts and credit cards and close all the ones that are jointly owned by you and your ex-spouse. In the best-case scenario, failure to take this step can leave your accounts open to fines and maintenance charges for accounts you don’t really use. In the worst-case scenario, your ex-spouse can rack up huge bills on a shared credit card or leave a shared checking account in the red, leaving you to pick up the tab or risk ruining your credit score and financial health. 

2. Change beneficiaries on your savings and retirement accounts

This step is equally important and is also often forgotten about by divorced individuals until it’s too late. Neglecting to change the beneficiaries on your accounts after a divorce can mean your ex-spouse ends up inheriting your IRA, 401(k) or another savings account after you pass away. Changing the beneficiaries on each relevant account can be done quickly and easily with a single form. Look for the designation of “primary beneficiary” and “contingent beneficiary” on each account’s form and list your choice. 

3. Review your living trust and make any necessary changes

Don’t wait to review your living trust and estate plan or you may never make the necessary changes. Speak to your attorney for guidance. If your ex-spouse is the one who primarily dealt with the attorney and you’re looking for a new start, you can ask friends and family to recommend a new attorney you can use. 

4. Open new accounts

Once the divorce is finalized, you’ll want to open new accounts with your name exclusively listed as the owner. This includes credit cards, checking and savings accounts. Once you have new credit cards in your name, take steps to build up your credit quickly, like making regular, small purchases on your cards and paying the balance in full each month.

5. Update your insurance coverage

You don’t want to get stuck paying for coverage you don’t use — or worse, get stuck with no coverage at all. Review all your insurance policies, including life, health, auto and homeowner’s insurance, then change any plans that were shared with your ex-spouse. Pay particular attention to assets you may have listed in your homeowner’s policy as you may not own all of them any longer and each asset can increase your premium. Now that you are on your own, you may also want to consider taking out a disability insurance policy, which will provide you with the monthly equivalent of a paycheck if you become injured and are unable to work for an extended period of time. 

6. Build an emergency fund

Divorce is often expensive, and you may have wiped your savings clean after splitting up with your ex. Now that you are single again, it’s more important than ever to have a safety net that can tide you over in case of an emergency. You can open a new savings account at Advantage One Credit Union for just this purpose and save aggressively until you have enough to cover three to six months’ worth of expenses.

7. Adjust your budget to fit your new financial situation

You may have lost one stream of income in the divorce, but your everyday expenses will likely be considerably lower. On the other hand, you may have new expenses to cover, such as alimony and child support. Take the time to sit down and determine how your income and expenses have changed after the divorce, and then adjust your budget accordingly. 

8. Update all legal documents and records

If you’ve changed your legal name during the divorce, be sure to change the name of record on all your legal documents and accounts, including your driver’s license and Social Security number. You can contact your local DMV and the Social Security Administration for assistance. 

9. Purchase a new safe and shredder

If your ex walked away from the divorce with the safe and shredder, be sure to replace them as quickly as possible. A home safe is the best place to keep valuables and important documents, and shredding any documents containing sensitive information that you no longer need is an important part of protecting yourself from identity thieves.  

10. Analyze your investments

If your ex-spouse handled all the investing in your marriage, you’ll need to analyze your investments and create a new portfolio that fits your own investment style and needs. Consider working with an investment advisor for guidance.

Getting divorced can spell disaster for your finances, but it doesn’t have to be that way. By taking the steps outlined here you can keep your financial independence after a divorce.

Your Turn: Which financial steps have you taken after a divorce? Tell us about it in the comments. 

My Money My Way: Taking Back Control of Your Financial Life

Title: My Money My Way: Taking Back Control of Your Financial Life

Author: Kumiko Love

Hardcover: 240 pages

Publisher: Portfolio

Publishing date: Feb. 1, 2022

Who is this book for? 

  • Single women looking for tips on managing finances on their own. 
  • Anyone who’s ever battled feelings of guilt, shame, doubt and/or deprivation in relation to money. 
  • Individuals looking to live a financially emancipated life. 

What’s inside this book?

  • Kumiko’s story of how she went from a newly divorced mom pulling in just $24,000 a year and facing $77,000 in debt to living completely debt-free in a home she bought with cash. 
  • Stories of moms, like Kumiko, who successfully navigated divorce and the financial challenge of making it alone.
  • Practical tools and tips for letting go of shame and deprivation for living a financially secure and fulfilling life. 

4 lessons you’ll learn from this book:  

  1. How to harness your emotions to your financial benefit, instead of letting them control you and drive your money choices. 
  2. How to create a budget based on your actual life, not a life of self-deprivation.
  3. How to create a debt payoff plan that can work.
  4. How to build a positive relationship with money. 

4 questions this book will answer for you:  

  1. How can I reverse negative thinking patterns that I’ve grown accustomed to?
  2. How can I align my emotional health with my financial health? 
  3. Can I take control of my finances with a low income and high credit card debt?
  4. Do I need to live with constant deprivation to have a financially secure life?

What people are saying about this book: 

  • “It’s no surprise that millions of people flock to Kumiko Love for her financial advice. She’s able to do the impossible: teach others about money in a non-judgmental, down-to-earth way while also making concepts, like budgeting and debt-repayment, exciting and fun.” – Jessica Moorhouse
  • “No shame. No condescension. Just real, practical money talk from a woman who lives it. Kumiko reminds us that our money struggles and mistakes are not a reflection of who we are or what we can achieve. And her tools and strategies offer an easy-to-follow framework for using money to build a lifestyle you love.” – Stefanie O’Connell Rodriguez
  • “If you’re ready to break free from a dysfunctional relationship with money and build wealth from a place of strength, Kumiko’s book is a must-read.” – Marie Forleo
  • “It’s so wonderful to see more voices join the movement that money shouldn’t be rigid or restrictive. Kumiko Love and her money management style will help you feel seen and capable instead of shamed and distressed — no matter the money mistakes in your past.” – Erin Lowry

 Your Turn: What did you think of My Money My Way? Share your opinion in the comments. 

12 Steps to Financial Wellness-Step 1: How to Track Your Spending

Are you ready to join us on a journey toward financial wellness?

Each month, Advantage One Credit Union will focus on one step of a journey of financial wellness. We’ll tackle the topic in detail and help you learn all you need to know about this step. Follow along, and at the end of the year, you’ll have mastered the tools for a life of financial wellness.

Tracking your spending is the first step toward greater financial awareness and, ultimately, toward financial health. However, mastering this skill is easier said than done. How can you track every dollar you spend when you make multiple purchases each day?

We’ve outlined how to track your spending in 3 easy steps. 

1. Choose your tools

Tracing every dollar’s journey isn’t easy, but with the right tools, you can make it quick and simple. Choose from one of the following money-tracking techniques: 

  • Budgeting apps. If your life happens on your phone, you can download a budgeting app like YNAB or Mint to help you track your spending. Both apps allow you to allocate a specific amount of money for each spending category for each month, and will enable you to track your spending with just a few clicks. It’s important to note that YNAB is not a free app, but that it may be worth the price for users who want to take on a more active role in their money management. 
  • Spreadsheet. If you like to see everything spelled out clearly, a spreadsheet might be a better choice for you. You’ll need to record every transaction, but if you prepare the sheet with all the spending categories you think you’ll need, this step shouldn’t take long at all. 
  • The envelope system. If you’re a big cash spender, consider withdrawing the cash you think you’ll spend in a month (or in a week) and keeping it in an envelope designated for each category. When you need to make a purchase, just use money from the envelope. 
  • Receipts. Hold onto every receipt from the purchases you make this month to help you track your spending. 

Pencil and paper. Recording each purchase the old-fashioned way can help you make more mindful money choices throughout the day. Be sure to keep a steady supply of both writing instruments handy at all times so you never miss a purchase. 

2. Review your checking account and credit card statements carefully

Along with one of the tools listed above, you can track the purchases you make using plastic by reviewing your monthly checking account and credit card statements at the end of the month. You may receive these in the mail, or you can access them online by logging into your account and downloading.

3. Review and categorize your purchases

At the end of the month, use your chosen tool to review all the purchases you’ve made throughout the month. If you’ve used an app or a spreadsheet, adding your purchases to find the total amount of money spent will be simple. The app or spreadsheet may have already helped you divide the money spent into separate categories as well. Similarly, if you’ve used the envelope system, you should know how much you spent on each kind of purchase this month. However, if you’ve chosen another method to track your spending, you’ll need to crunch some numbers to get an accurate picture of your spending habits.

When completing this step, don’t forget to include any automated payments you may rarely think about, such as subscription fees and insurance premiums.

Tracking your spending and identifying your money drains is the first step toward greater financial awareness and responsibility. Use the tips outlined here to successfully master the skill of tracking your spending. 

Your Turn: How do you track your spending? Share your tips with us in the comments.  

Your Complete Year-End Financial Checklist

As 2021 draws to a close and we prepare to usher in 2022, take a moment to go through this year-end financial checklist for ensuring your finances are in order before the start of the New Year.

  1. Review your budget

Is your monthly budget still working well for you? Are you stretching some spending categories or finishing each month in the red? Take some time to review your budget and make any necessary changes.

  1. Top off your retirement plan

If you have a 401(k), check to see that you are taking full advantage of your employer’s matching contributions. If you haven’t contributed as much as you can, you have until the end of the year (Dec. 31, 2021) to catch up; to a limit of $19,500. If you turned 50 this year, you are eligible for an additional catch-up contribution of $6,500. If you anticipate getting a holiday bonus, consider putting this money toward your debt. 

Likewise, if you have an IRA, you have until April 15 to scrape together the maximum contribution of  $6,000, with an additional $1,000 if you are age 50 years or older. 

  1. Check your progress on paying down debt

 Give your debt an annual checkup by reviewing your outstanding debts from one year ago and holding up the amounts against what you now owe. Have you shed debt from one year ago, or is your debt growing? If you’ve made no progress, or your debt has grown, consider taking bigger steps toward paying it down in 2022, such as consolidating your debt with a [personal/unsecured] loan from Advantage One Credit Union.  

  1. Get a free copy of your annual credit report

The end of the year is a great time for an annual credit checkup. It’s a good idea to review your statements each month to check for fraudulent charges, but you can also request a free copy of your credit report from all three credit agencies once a year. Get your free annual credit reports here, and take a close look at each report. Look for accurate, updated information and any errors, like charges you don’t remember making, or other signs of possible identity theft. If you find any wrongful charges, be sure to dispute them immediately.  

  1. Review your investments and asset allocation

Take some time at year’s end to rebalance your portfolio and to see if your asset allocation is still serving you well. You may need to make some changes to your mix of stocks, bonds, cash and other investments to better reflect the current state of the market.  

  1. Review your beneficiaries

Has your family situation changed in the past year? If it has, be sure to switch the beneficiaries on your accounts and life insurance policies to accommodate these changes. 

  1. Complete open enrollment and select your employer benefits

The end of the year coincides with open enrollment for health insurance policies. This is your chance to select the employer benefits you want for the coming year. If you miss this window, you will be stuck with the benefits you chose last year or with no benefits at all. 

  1. Review your tax withholdings

It’s a good idea to review your W-4 annually and see if the amount of tax being withheld from each paycheck needs to be adjusted. If you’re not a numbers person, ask your accountant for help. Changing up the numbers just a bit can make a significant difference in your tax bill at the end of the year. Or, if you usually get a large refund, adjusting the amount withheld can mean enjoying a larger paycheck throughout the year instead of giving the government an interest-free loan to be paid back in one lump sum at year’s end.  

The doors are closing on 2021 and it’s time to give your finances a full checkup. Use this checklist to make sure your money matters are in order before the start of 2022.

Your Turn: What’s on your financial checklist for the end of the year? Tell us about it in the comments.

Single Women and Money: How to Live Well on Your Income

Title: Single Women and Money: How to Live Well on Your Income

Author: Margaret Price, Jill Gianola

Hardcover: 216 pages

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Publishing date: Nov. 11, 2021

Who is this book for? 

  • Single women who are struggling to live a financially secure and successful life on a single salary, which is typically less than what men earn.
  • Soon-to-be single women looking for concrete advice on managing while on one income stream. 

What’s inside this book?

  • Practical tools to help single women achieve and maintain financial independence. 
  • Financial advice from experts on issues specific to divorcees, widows and single moms.
  • Real-life stories of single women who are financially secure and the steps they took to get there. 
  • Resources for single women experiencing financial difficulties.

4 lessons you’ll learn from this book: 

  1. How to save and spend wisely on a single salary.
  2. How to get rid of debt when you’re living alone.
  3. How to find investments that align with your values.
  4. How to plan for a solo retirement.

 4 questions this book will answer for you: 

 How can I support my children and give them a financially secure childhood when I’m living single?

  1. Is it possible to reenter the workforce at age 55?
  2. How can I protect my financial assets and leave a legacy as a single woman?
  3. How can society help single women through financial difficulties? 

 What people are saying about this book: 

  • “Whether widowed, divorced, or never partnered, single women all too often face greater financial challenges than do single men and married couples. This book contains sound advice and valuable resources for women of all ages seeking financial security and peace of mind on their own.” – George Manne
  • “Single women face enormous financial problems. This canny guide to personal finance, geared toward a large (66 million) share of the U.S. population, spells out smart strategies to surmount the obstacles. How to handle retirement planning, debt, taxes, single motherhood, landing a job after age 55—all these vital questions get answered, and well, by the intrepid team of Margaret Price and Jill Gianola.” – Janet Marks
  • Single Women and Money delivers clear, concise, hands-on information. It’s the breakthrough guide to financial security that America’s millions of single women can use.” – Larry Light

 Your Turn: What did you think of Single Women and Money? Share your opinion in the comments. 

We Should All Be Millionaires

We Should All Be Millionaires: A Woman’s Guide to Earning More, Building Wealth, and Gaining Economic Power

Title: We Should All Be Millionaires: A Woman’s Guide to Earning More, Building Wealth, and Gaining Economic Power

Author: Rachel Rodgers

Hardcover: 304 pages

Publisher: HarperCollins Leadership

Publishing date: May 4, 2021

Who is this book for? 

  • Women, people of color, and anyone who is part of a systematically marginalized group and wants to learn how to become a millionaire.

What’s inside this book?

  • A fascinating history lesson on how women and people of color have been prevented from building wealth for centuries.
  • Financial lessons that self-made millionaire, Rachel Rodgers, has learned on her journey to wealth. 
  • A step-by-step guide on how to overcome obstacles and build wealth.
  • An explanation why much of the financial advice you may have heard in the past is patriarchal nonsense. 
  • A complete overview of Rodgers’ $10K in 10 Days Challenge.

4 lessons you’ll learn from this book: 

  1. Why earning more money is not selfish or greedy.
  2. How to stop making destructive decisions and start making million-dollar decisions instead. 
  3. How to let go of financial shame.
  4. Strategies to earn more money and fatten your financial accounts. 

4 questions this book will answer for you: 

  1. Why are only 10% of the world’s millionaires women? 
  2. How can I overcome shaky confidence and imposter syndrome to build wealth? 
  3. How can I gain more peace, prosperity and joy? 
  4. How can I set and enforce “Million Dollar Boundaries” in every aspect of my life?

What people are saying about this book: 

  • We Should All be Millionaires” is a must-read, not only to help you become more financially abundant and empowered, but also so that you can become a much-needed agent of change, equality, and equity that our world needs.” –Mastin Kipp
  • “This book is an honest, realistic, and inspiring look at what it really takes to become an extremely high-earning woman. Rachel Rodgers will give you a million dollar attitude with a bank account to match.” –Sophia Amoru
  • “As a Black women, we are accustomed to the story that we are required to struggle in order to find financial stability or success. This book needs to be read by every woman who is ready for a blueprint for being joyful, finding ease, and growing wealth while standing up for causes that need our voices and attention.” –Rachel Cargle

Your Turn: What did you think of We Should All be Millionaires? Share your opinion in the comments.