Thriving in a Multi-generational Workplace

Whether you’re the “old guy” at #work or working with a bunch of older employees, you can all learn to get along and do great things. Read our tips for how to handle a mixed #workplace!

Gone are the days when you got a job out of high school or college and then worked there for 40 years, got a party and gold watch before living off your pension and IRA.

Whether it’s for financial reasons or to fulfill a desire to remain productive and useful, workers are remaining employed way past traditional retirement age. According to Business Insider.com U.S. census statistics report that, as of February 2019, about 20% of Americans over age 65 — a total of 10.6 million people — were either working or looking for work.

This resulted in today’s multi-generational workplace, which brings with it conflicts from work ethic to technological know-how.

Here’s how older workers can face the workday feeling like an integral part of their team:

Break down generational stereotypes. Understanding other age groups’ work styles leads to respectful attitudes. Working on a project with a younger co-worker can integrate varied viewpoints, and often produces innovative ideas.

Learn from each other. While older workers can pass along their years of knowledge and experience as well as business contacts, younger workers can share their experience with the latest tech and social media channels.

Fill in communication gaps. Let your manager know if you are not comfortable with the method of communication in the office. Unless it is mandatory that workers use the company email or messaging system, let your manager know your preferred communication methods.

Respect each other. In creating a harmonious work environment, it all comes down to mutual respect. The key to establishing respect among generations is knowing that your co-workers’ motivation, work style and experience is different than yours. It also helps to be flexible and accommodate their needs and preferences.

It takes effort on everyone’s part to create balance in a multi-generational workplace. Teamwork makes the dream work!

Your turn: What’s your experience working in a multi-generational workplace? Tell us about it in the comments.

Learn More:
businessinsider.com
kellyservices.us
investopedia.com
mindtools.com

How to Create Your First Elevator Pitch

Elevator pitches take humble-bragging to a new level. At its core, the concept of an elevator pitch is to squeeze all you can about your talents, strengths and work experience into the time it takes for an elevator to travel from one floor to the next.

Your last few months in college are a great time for polishing your elevator pitch until it is perfect. You can use it to answer common interview questions as you job hunt, or just have it handy if you happen to run into a potential new employer, anytime, anywhere. Working on your elevator pitch will also help you clarify your work goals as you prepare to transition to a new stage of life.

To make this task easier, we’ve broken down the process of creating a killer elevator pitch into seven simple steps. While reading through each section, jot down a few sentences that cover the details of that category. Don’t worry about the writing or syntax here; we’ll get to that.

Step 1: Introduce yourself

Launch your pitch with a super-short intro about your background. Include your name, your major and your unique interests. You can also throw in a one-liner about any special research projects or volunteer work you’ve participated in during college.

Step 2: Talk about your work experience

Now that listeners know who you are, start listing any work experience you already have in your field. Include paid work as well as internships.

Step 3: Sell yourself

Now, you’re going to step in with your professional strengths and areas of expertise. It’s OK to boast a bit here, as long as you don’t cross the line into arrogance. Just speak matter-of-factly and tell the absolute truth. For example, if you’re a law major looking for a paid internship in a large law firm and you know you have a way with words, you can talk about the way you’ve always been chosen as the spokesperson in college work, or how you dominated the debate team thanks to your fantastic oratory skills.

Step 4: Talk about what you can bring to the team

What are your work goals? What kind of value can you bring to the company? Take a minute to put this into words.

Step 5: Wrap it up 

Close your pitch with an eye toward the future by talking about how you can’t wait to hear back from your listener, or how you look forward to working for them or in their company.

Step 6: Put it all together

Now that you’ve got the content for an elevator pitch written down, it’s time to bring it together in a short, hard-hitting pitch.

First, go through each section to pull out the most important parts. Leave out anything that is not absolutely essential. Next, start the actual writing by putting it all together in one paragraph. Remember: Time is limited here, so keep it short and sweet. Elevator pitches are best when delivered in 30 seconds or less, which gives you approximately 75 words to work with. Once you’ve got it all in one place, read through your pitch again and again, weeding out anything that sounds awkward or isn’t crucial to your pitch. When you’ve got it down to 75 words or less, you’re ready to move on.

Step 7: Practice, practice, practice

A perfectly written pitch is worthless if the delivery is lacking. You want to come off sounding super-confident and capable to any potential employer you meet. Practice delivering your pitch in front of the mirror and with friends until you know it by heart. It’s also a good idea to record yourself speaking so you can hear how you sound and make any necessary changes to the word flow.

Keep at it until you can deliver the elevator pitch in your sleep.

Now that you’ve mastered the art of the elevator pitch, you’re ready to get out there and blow those employers away with your talent and skills. Go get ‘em!

Your Turn: We’d love to hear your elevator pitch! Share it with us in the comments.

Learn more:
http://www.monster.com
http://www.learnat30.com

Power Moves: How Women Can Pivot, Reboot, and Build a Career of Purpose

Title: Power Moves: How Women Can Pivot, Reboot, and Build a Career of Purpose
Author: Lauren McGoodwin
Hardcover: 288 pages
Publisher: Harper Business
Publishing date: May 19, 2020
Average customer review: 5 out of 5 stars

Who is this book for?

  • Young professionals who feel stuck and are lacking career fulfillment
  • Followers of McGoodwin’s Career Contessa site who want to build on their career know-how
  • Businesswomen who are seeking growth and a career change

What’s inside this book?

  • Information, guidance, advice and essential tools to help women shed self-doubt and fear, and also take bold steps forward in their careers
  • Helpful to-do’s and checklists to provide accountability
  • Powerful graphics to bring the lessons to life

5 lessons you’ll learn from this book:

  • How to cut out comparison, shame, and self-loathing
  • How to abandon the idea of that elusive “dream job”
  • How to embrace your inner questioner, your inner quester and your inner quitter
  • How to make money moves and take control of your financial future
  • How women can build a successful career on their own terms

4 questions this book will answer for you:

  • What is a Power Move and why does it matter?
  • How can I tune out noise and better tune in my own voice?
  • How can I bypass the quest for perfection and move directly toward career growth?
  • What practical steps do I need to take before making a career change?

What people are saying about this book:

  • Honest, candid, and thoughtful
  • An easy read with actionable advice
  • Power Moves is an honest and brave manifesto on how to take control of your career and, ultimately, your happiness, on your terms.
  • If you are ready to achieve real success in your career (and life), this is the book you absolutely need to read right now.
  • There is a certain type of savvy I thought couldn’t be taught, but Lauren McGoodwin is making her sharp instincts accessible to everyone. She is part trusted friend who knows what you’re up against, part professional guru who wants to help you realize your full potential.

Your Turn:
Are you a Lauren McGoodwin fan? Tell us what you love about her approach in the comments.

Learn More:
amazon.com
goodreads.com
barnesandnoble.com

How to Make Your Career Choice Fit Your Budget

Young woman sadly regards a document on her desk.As you prepare for graduation and begin scouting different employment opportunities, be sure to look at the larger picture before you accept a position.

Hopefully, you’ve chosen a career path that will bring you joy and gratification. Equally important, though, is a job that can support your lifestyle choices. While the positions you consider for your first post-college job will likely offer the opportunity for growth, you’ll still need to pay your bills—and make your student loan payments—as soon as you graduate. A job that brings you satisfaction and a pleasant working environment will not last long if the salary it offers causes you to sink into debt.

How do you determine what kind of salary will be large enough to support your desired lifestyle?

To get this information, you’ll need to create a mock monthly budget for your post-college self.

Using a spreadsheet or paper and pen, create two columns, one for expenses and one for actual dollar amounts. In the expense column, list your typical monthly expenses, including housing costs, transportation costs, health insurance, groceries, entertainment costs, clothing costs, dining out, savings, etc. In the dollar column, list the amount of money you expect to pay every month for each expense.

Your budget should look something like this:

ExpenseMonthly Cost
Housing$1,200
Transportation$300
Health Insurance$250
Groceries$350
Student Loan Payments$350

It will take some research and some hard, honest thinking to come up with these numbers. For housing costs, take a moment to think about where you see yourself settling down after college. You don’t have to know the exact neighborhood you’ll live in, but it’s good to know the city that will work best for you in terms of lifestyle, career path, and family plans. You can narrow this down to a few choices so long as you keep it reasonable. Once you’ve chosen your desired location, research the median rental prices in the area on real estate sites like Zillow and Redfin.

Next, work on transportation costs. If you already own a car, you’ll have an idea of what it costs you each month. Otherwise, spend some time thinking about what kind of car you want to drive. You can find listings on Carfax.com. Include costs like auto insurance, gas, and upkeep, in this category.

Or, if you plan on living somewhere with reliable public transportation, you might choose this route instead. Make a calculation of how much you’ll spend on bus and/or train rides, along with the occasional cab or ride-share ride.

Complete your budget using your best estimates for each category. Once you’ve filled out each expense amount, add up your total and multiply it by 12 to give you the amount of money you’ll need each year for supporting the lifestyle of your choice. (This number will increase with inflation, but since current salaries will likely increase along with the inflation rate, this exercise can still give you an idea of the annual salary you’ll need.)

Now that you have these numbers, you’re ready to go ahead with your job search. When considering possible positions, you don’t have to choose the one that pays the highest salary if there are other things about the job you don’t love. However, it’s best to pursue positions that can actually support you.

Your Turn:
Are you choosing your first job for the salary or for other factors? Share your take with us in the comments.

Learn More:
knsfinancial.com
money.usnews.com
money.usnews.com
brazen.com

From Summer Job To Just Plain Job: How To Turn Your Internship Into A Promising Career

cartoon of woman juggling three balss, labeled internship, job & careerSummer internships are a rite of passage for college students, but how can you turn yours into your dream job? Read on for the next steps you’ll need to transition it into an actual job.

Here’s the good news: You’re in the door, because most companies prefer hiring from within.

Unfortunately, it’s not automatic; the company won’t necessarily find a position for you. That said, it’s not impossible. It only takes a combination of accomplishment, luck and know-how to land your dream position.

If you’re struggling with converting your internship into a full-time position, remember these five pointers:

1.) Ask for a specific position
A common mistake made by job-seekers is asking the broad question, “Are you hiring?” The answer may be yes, but it’s unlikely that anyone knows about every open position. An advantage of being an intern is learning about potential openings.

Keep an ear out for new projects, teams or promotions, as these will likely have new positions. Your immediate supervisor may not be able to hire you, but he can connect you with someone who can and recommend you for a position.

2.) Time your ask
Don’t ask about future employment on the last day of your internship; it makes you look like a procrastinator.

Ideally, ask after a big win. When you’ve just completed a major project, you’ve got the limelight. It doesn’t have to be a vital-to-the-life-of-the-company project, but should be a significant success showcasing your skills.

When referencing this accomplishment, use a humble-brag. Ask your immediate supervisor if the task was done to their satisfaction. Getting them to sing your praises makes them more likely to recommend you for another position.

3.) Be everywhere
Part of the benefit of an internship is the chance to see the inner workings of a company. You can learn about different aspects of the business – but not through keeping your head down. Instead, take every opportunity to visit and work with other departments and people. The more people who know your name, the more likely it is you’ll get to stay.

4.) Become indispensable
Lack of experience can be an asset in your internship as it provides you with tremendous flexibility in how you tackle tasks. Find a piece of technology or a set of procedures you can master, either through training or observing others. Your objective is to become an expert in something the company needs. It can even be running the copier – anything goes, if it gets you in the door.

5.) Be professional
The best attribute to display in your internship is follow-through. Be on time to work and take on every task with enthusiasm and dedication. Demonstrate to your employer that you’re someone they’d want to hire.

The summer internship can be a great start to a great career – if you want it to be. With a lot of work and a little luck, it can be the first in a series of career successes.

Sources:

https://www.themuse.com/advice/from-intern-to-colleague-3-secrets-for-landing-a-fulltime-gig

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/05/20/turn-your-internship-into-a-full-time-job/#1d0f3bf5483c

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/college-summer-internships-dream-job-networking-165310981.html