5 Apps to Download this Holiday Season

Todoist
With the holidays coming, there’s so much to do! Keep it all organized with this top-rated productivity app. With Todoist, (iOS, Android) users can create and manage to-do lists, track completed tasks and set reminders for those last-minute oft forgotten holiday errands. Download the free version, unlock additional features for $3/month or upgrade to the premium version for $5/month.

Key features:

  • Task management — The app’s slick interface and many convenient features make task management easy, even when your to-do list is longer than Santa’s beard.
  • Prioritize tasks — Make sure you get the most important stuff done before moving on to your holiday wish list by prioritizing tasks.
  • Project goals — Set goals and timelines for when you want a specific task to be completed and let the sophisticated visuals keep you focused on your goal.
  • Reports — Track your progress on various tasks with the app’s measurement and reporting features.
  • Cross-platform use — Todoist lets you sync your lists across all devices for easy task-tracking and management.

Christmas Countdown
Get into the holiday spirit with the ultimate snowy countdown to Christmas (iOS , Android) !

Key features:

  • Choose from eight beautiful, holiday-themed backgrounds to customize your app.
  • Enjoy classic Christmas music without intrusive ads.
  • Unwrap a new virtual gift every day of December.

Christmas Gift List
Significant others, kids, parents, friends, workmates, gym buddies, great aunt Martha — there are so many gifts to keep track of this season! Ward off that migraine that starts forming each time you tackle your multiple gift lists by downloading this super-convenient app. The Christmas Gift List (iOS, Android) app will organize your lists and let you track your ideas, spending and progress as you shop. Gift-shopping is fun again!

Key features:

  • Set a budget for everyone on your list to help keep your spending under control.
  • Share your list with shopping buddies through Twitter and emails.
  • Easily cross gifts off your list by updating their status as you shop.

Elfster
If you’re planning a secret Santa exchange with your friends and family, you need to download this app. Elfster (iOS , Android) will let you create and track multiple groups of secret Santa exchanges and help keep things organized with its user-friendly interface.

Key features:

  • Set a delivery date for each group, along with a fixed budget and a customized message for all group members.
  • Invite friends to join a group through email, or by sharing a group link.
  • Assign a secret Santa for each group member easily through the app’s generator feature.

Your Turn: What’s your favorite holiday app? Tell us all about it in the comments!

Learn More:
mobileappdaily.com
getandroidstuff.com

What’s a Recession Anyway?

Unless you’ve been living in a bunker for the last several months, you’ve likely caught the term “recession” thrown around on the news more than once. Hearing this word being used to describe the state of the U.S. economy can trigger a range of reactions from mild anxiety to a full-blown stuffing-money-under-the-mattress panic.

For many people, though, part of their angst surrounding the state of the economy is the vast amount of unknown: What is the exact definition of a recession? How is it different from a depression? How long do recessions usually last? What causes a recession?

So many questions — but we’ve got answers! Here’s all you need to know about recessions, the current state of the U.S. economy and what all of this means to you as a private consumer.

What is a recession? 

A recession is a widespread economic decline in a designated region that lasts for several months or longer. In a recession, the gross domestic product (GDP), or the total value of all goods and services produced in the region, decreases for two consecutive quarters. A healthy economy is continually expanding, so a contracting GDP suggests that problems are brewing within the economy. In most recessions, the GDP growth will slow for several quarters before it turns negative.

What’s the difference between a recession and a depression?

A depression has criteria similar to that of a recession, but is much more severe. For example, in both a recession and a depression the unemployment rate rises; however, during the Great Recession of 2008, the worst recession in U.S. history to date, unemployment peaked at 10%, while during the Great Depression, unemployment levels soared to 25%. Similarly, during the Great Recession, the GDP contracted by 4.2%, while during the Great Depression it shrank by 30%.

Depressions also last a lot longer than recessions. The Great Depression officially lasted for four years but continued to impact the economy for more than a decade. In contrast, recessions generally last only 11 months, according to data from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

There have been 47 recessions in U.S. history, and a total of 13 recessions since the Great Depression. There has only been a single recorded depression in our country’s history.

What causes a recession? 

A recession can be triggered by a variety of factors:

  • A sudden economic shock that causes severe financial damage.
  • Excessive debt carried by consumers and businesses, leading to debt defaults and bankruptcies.
  • Asset bubbles, or when investors’ make irrational decisions, overbuy stocks and then rush to sell, causing a market crash.
  • Excessive inflation and rising interest rates, which triggers a decline in economic activity.
  • Excessive deflation, which sparks a decrease in wages, further depressing prices.
  • Technological changes, including outsourcing jobs to machines or other technological breakthroughs that alter the way entire industries operate.

Why the COVID-19 recession is unlike any other?

In June 2020, the NBER  announced that the U.S. economy had been in recession since February.

The COVID-19 recession, also known as the coronavirus recession, the Great Shutdown, the Great Lockdown or the Coronavirus Crash, is unique because it was sparked by an unforeseen pandemic and not by any inherent problem within the economy.

Another anomaly of the coronavirus recession is the super-healthy state of the economy before it hit. In February, unemployment levels were at a 50-year low, stock markets were at a record high and the U.S. economy had enjoyed 126 months of growth,  its longest period of uninterrupted expansion in history.

The unusual triggers and the explosive start of the current recession may be good news for its eventual end. Economists initially were hopeful that the recession could reverse itself quickly with a V-shaped recovery. Unfortunately, due to prolonged lockdowns and the nationwide failure to keep infection rates down, they have since declared that a rapid rebound is unlikely. There is still hope for a relatively fast recovery. An April Reuters poll  found that nearly half of 45 economists believed the U.S. recovery would be U-shaped: slower and more gradual than a V-shaped recovery, but still fairly quick.

How will this recession affect me?

The coronavirus recession can impact the average consumer in multiple ways.

First, many are struggling with sudden unemployment or will be facing joblessness in the coming months. The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show the unemployment rate at a staggering 10.2%.

Second, the economic uncertainty has triggered record-low interest rates, which in turn sparked a rush to refinance. If you are currently paying high interest rates on a long-term loan, you may want to consider refinancing and enjoying a lower monthly payment.

Finally, investments in stocks, bonds and real estate may lose value during a recession.

Your Turn: What do you think will be most impacted by the coronavirus recession? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Beware the Pending Package Scam

Everyone loves a surprise package, and scammers are taking the excitement out of that experience by using bogus packages as a cover for a nefarious scam that tricks victims into sharing their personal information — and their money.

Here’s all you need to know about the pending package text scam:

How the scam plays out

In the circulating package delivery scam, the victim receives a text message from a contact who is an alleged mail carrier, or someone representing a package-delivery service. The contact tells the victim they were unable to deliver a package to the victim’s home. The message might claim the package is a gift from a friend or relative and may be worded professionally, making the scam difficult to spot.

The victim is asked to reply to the message to confirm their identity; however, as soon as they engage with the scammer, they will be asked to share their personal information or credit card details to schedule delivery. This, of course, places the victim at risk for identity theft.

In other variations of the scam, the victim is contacted by email or phone. In each scenario, the scam plays out in a similar manner, with the victim convinced there’s a package waiting for them, and willingly sharing sensitive data with a criminal.

Some scammers take the ruse a step further by sending the victim a text message or an email containing an embedded link. The victim is instructed to click on the “tracking link” to track the package or change their delivery preferences. Unfortunately, clicking on the link will download malware into the victim’s device. Alternatively, the link connects the victim to a form asking for their personal information, which the victim often shares willingly.

Red flags

There are two primary red flags that can serve to warn you about the pending package scam.

First, the original text, email or phone call, will generally not inform the victim of the identity of the company they represent. The scammer will only claim to be an employee of a mail or package delivery service, but will not verify if they work for UPS, FedEx or another legitimate organization.

Second, the scammers don’t always check if the victim actually has a package in transit. They’ll either assume the victim has recently ordered something online or they’ll claim a friend or family has sent a surprise gift. If you know that neither of these is true, you can be on the alert for a possible scam.

Don’t get scammed!

Take these precautions to avoid being the next victim of a pending package scam:

  • Be wary of unsolicited communications. Your mail carrier and package-delivery services will never contact you via text message or phone call. If a package cannot be delivered for any reason, they will usually leave you a note on the door.
  • Be wary of “professional” emails sent from unsecure addresses. Any online communications from the USPS or a mail delivery agency will be sent via their own secure domain. Always be suspicious of emails sent from unsecure addresses.
  • Track all incoming packages. After placing an order for an item, record the tracking number for the package so you can easily verify its whereabouts. This way, you can quickly confirm the authenticity of any suspicious texts, emails or phone calls about your package.
  • Never share personal information with an unverified contact. Be super-wary when asked to share sensitive information via text, or when online or on a phone call. If you suspect fraud, end the conversation immediately and do not engage further.
  • Never click on links in unsolicited emails. Links in emails can download malware onto your computer or device. Don’t click links in emails from people you don’t know or from companies you have not asked to contact you. Be wary of official-looking email; popular brands can easily be spoofed.

 If you’ve been targeted

If you believe you’ve been targeted by a pending package scam, it’s important not to engage with the scammer. Delete any suspicious text messages and block the number of the contact. Similarly, delete suspicious emails and mark them as spam. You can also report the scam to the local authorities and to the Federal Trade Commission. Finally, it’s a good idea to  warn your friends and family members about the circulating scam.

Your Turn: How do you determine if you’ve been targeted by a pending package scam? Tell us about it in the comments.

The Path: Accelerating Your Journey to Financial Freedom

Title: The Path: Accelerating Your Journey to Financial Freedom

Authors: Peter Mallouk, Tony Robbins

Hardcover: 320 pages

Publisher: Post Hill Press

Publishing date:  Oct. 13, 2020

Who is this book for?

  • Wannabe investors of any age or stage
  • Experienced investors
  • Readers seeking financial freedom

What’s inside this book?

  • A step-by-step guide for achieving financial freedom
  • Strategies for mastering your money from an award-winning financial adviser and an expert business strategist
  • Real-life success stories from experienced and beginner investors

5 lessons you’ll learn from this book: 

  • How markets behave and how to maintain peace of mind during times of volatility
  • How to chart a personalized course for financial security
  • How to select a financial adviser who prioritizes your own interests
  • How to navigate, select or reject the many types of investments available
  • Why success without fulfillment is the ultimate failure

4 questions this book will answer for you: 

  • What does the financial service industry not want me to know?
  • How can I achieve true fulfillment?
  • Is this a good time for me to start investing?
  • Can I still master my money at a late stage in life?

What people are saying about this book: 

  • “Peter Mallouk’s tour of the financial world is a tour de force that’ll change the way you think about money.” — Jonathan Clements
  • “Robbins is the best economic moderator that I’ve ever worked with. His mission to bring insights from the world’s greatest financial minds to the average investor is truly inspiring.” — Alan Greenspan
  • “Tony is a force of nature.” — Jack Bogle

Your Turn: Have you read The Path? Tell us what you found to be the most valuable advice or benefit of the book in the comments.

The Importance of Being Financially Fit

Are you ready to stretch those financial fitness muscles? We hope so, because it’s time to get financially fit!

Being financially fit means living a life of complete financial responsibility. The Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI), also known as the Financial Health Network, defines four basic components of financial health: Spend, Save, Borrow and Plan. These components reference everyday financial activities. As such, every choice you make in terms of these four activities either builds or detracts from your financial fitness. Like physical fitness, you can beef up those fitness muscles a little bit more each day.

Being financially fit is crucial for a well-balanced, stress-free life. Here’s why (and how):

Expand your financial knowledge

A financially fit person is constantly broadening their money knowledge. They read personal finance books and blogs, attend financial education seminars and are aware of the evolving state of the economy. This enables them to make monetary decisions from a position of knowledge and power, leaving much less up to chance or luck.

Stick to a budget

A financially fit person knows that tracking monthly expenses is key to financial health. They are careful to set aside money from their monthly income for all fixed and discretionary expenses and to stay within budget for each spending category.

Minimize debt

A financially fit person is committed to paying down debts and seeks to live debt-free. Constant budgeting, ongoing financial education and planning ahead enables them to make it through the month, and through unexpected expenses, without spiraling into debt.

Maximize savings 

A financially fit person prioritizes savings. In fact, savings is a fixed item on their monthly budget instead of something that only happens if there’s money left over. This allows them to think ahead and build a comfortable nest egg or emergency fund. In turn, having a robust safety net means sleeping better at night knowing there’s money available to cover unexpected expenses or a change in life circumstances.

Maintain complete awareness of the state of your finances

A financially fit person knows exactly how much money they owe, the accumulated value of their assets and the complete sum of their fixed and fluctuating expenses. This awareness takes the stress out of money management, allowing them to make better financial choices.

Maintain a healthy credit score

A financially fit person knows that an excellent credit history and score is a crucial component to long-term financial health. They are careful to pay all bills on time, hold onto their credit cards for a while and to keep their credit utilization low. This enables them to qualify for long-term loans with favorable interest rates, which saves them money for years to come.

Help your money go further

A financially fit person does not waste large sums of money on interest charges for purchases made using borrowed funds via credit cards or loans. They live within their means and only use these resources for purchases they can actually afford, or for large, long-term assets, like a car or a house. This means they have more funds at their disposal to help build their wealth through savings and investments.

Create concrete financial goals

A financially fit person has long-term and short-term financial goals. This enables them to keep their focus on the big picture when making everyday money choices, empowering them to actually realize their financial dreams.

Achieve financial independence

A financially fit person is independent. They don’t rely on loans from friends or family members to get by, and they don’t need to pay with plastic at the end of the month because they ran out of money. Their well-padded emergency fund means they don’t depend on their monthly income to put bread on the table, either. By sticking to a budget, prioritizing savings and maintaining an awareness of their finances, they are strong, secure and completely independent.

Being financially fit means living a life without battling anxiety about getting through the month or stressing about the future. You can achieve financial fitness by committing to making choices in each of the four components of financial health (spend, save, borrow, plan) that are forward-thinking and help to build your financial wellness.

Your Turn: Why is financial fitness so important? Share your reasons with us in the comments.

Learn More:
femcove.com
doughroller.net
moneybites.com
forbes.com
cbsnews.com

What Do I Need to Know About Medicare?

Q: My 65th birthday is approaching and I’m ready to apply for Medicare. What do I need to know before signing up?

A: Medicare offers affordable health care coverage to older Americans, but the application process and the various options can be confusing. We have answers to all your questions about Medicare.

What is Medicare? 

Medicare is a federally funded program that provides health care coverage to Americans over age 65. It is generally also available to younger people with disabilities and people with end stage renal disease.

What are the different kinds of Medicare coverage?

There are two government-funded parts of Medicare:

  • Part A – Hospital Insurance. This coverage pays for inpatient hospital costs, is usually premium-free and is available to anyone age 65 or older who has worked — or whose spouse has worked — and paid Medicare taxes for a minimum of 10 years.
  • Part B – Medical Insurance. Medicare Part B offers coverage for services from doctors and other health care providers, outpatient hospital care, home health care, medical equipment and some preventive services. Part B is not free. Premiums vary by income level but are generally affordable. The standard monthly premium for Part B in 2020 is $144.60

There are also two privately obtained parts of Medicare:

  • Part C – Medicare Advantage. This plan provides extra coverage over Parts A and B and is offered by private insurance companies contracted with Medicare.
  • Part D – Prescription Drug Coverage. Also purchased through a private insurer, Part D offers full or partial coverage for prescription drugs.

Both Part C and Part D have monthly premiums, which vary in cost with each provider. There may be an annual deductible as well. Some people love the low costs and robust coverage of these plans, but some others find that they only cover a limited number of providers and are not worth the cost.

How do I apply for Medicare? 

If you’re ready to sign up for Medicare, you can apply online or in person at the nearest Social Security office. Applicants will need to provide their birth certificate or other proof of birth and proof of United States citizenship or legal residency.

What do I need to know before I apply for Medicare?

Before signing up for Medicare coverage, it’s best to learn these important facts:

  • You have a seven-month window to enroll in Medicare. Medicare eligibility begins at age 65, but applicants can sign up three months before the month of their 65th birthday, and up to three months after their birth month. Benefits are retroactive dating back to the applicant’s 65th birthday.
  • It pays to enroll on time. Signing up for Medicare during the initial enrollment window is crucial. It ensures the applicant has coverage in place should the need for it arise, and it helps the applicant avoid lifelong surcharges on Part B premiums. Otherwise, applicants face a 10% increase on these premiums for each year-long period they were eligible for Medicare but did not enroll.

What if I missed my Initial Enrollment Period (IEP)?

If an applicant has missed their IEP, they’ll need to enroll during the General Enrollment Period, which runs from Jan. 1 through March 31 each year. Applicants can also make changes to their general coverage during this time.

Can I make changes to my Medicare plan?

If you’d like to make changes to your Medicare Advantage or Medicare Prescription Drug plan, you can do so during the annual Medicare Advantage open enrollment period. This year, open enrollment will be from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2020. Any changes made during this period will take effect in January 2021.

Can I sign up for Medicare if I already have health coverage?

Many employees stay on at their jobs past their 65th birthday and will continue to enjoy the health coverage provided by their employer. These employees do not need to sign up for Medicare as soon as they hit 65 — they’ll be given a special enrollment period later on that will allow them to avoid the surcharges of late enrollment.

If an employee wants to keep their employer health coverage and also get coverage through Medicare, that is permitted as an option. In this scenario, Medicare would be used as a secondary insurance and the applicant would sign up for Part A, since that coverage is free and will be used to fill in the gaps of the employer’s insurance plan.

Your Turn: Have you recently applied for Medicare? Share your best tips with us in the comments.

What’s the Best Way to Use a Home Equity Loan?

Q: With interest rates falling and home prices rising, it seems like a great time to tap into my home’s equity using a home equity loan. What’s the best way to use these funds?

A: A home equity loan, or a HEL, can be a fantastic way to source extra funds during a falling-rates environment. Tapping into your home’s equity, or the positive difference between what is owed on a home and its current value, will give you the funds you need for a large expense with no additional strings attached.

With interest rates on a Advantage One Credit Union Home Equity Loan at just [XX%]APR*, the repayment plan is always affordable. If approved, you’ll receive the funds in one lump sum within a few days. There are no restrictions on how to use these funds, but since you’re essentially risking the loss of your home with this loan, it’s important to choose wisely when deciding how to use the funds.

Here are four forward-thinking uses for a home equity loan:

1. Home improvements

One of the most popular uses for home equity is for home renovations and improvements. These can be as major as adding a 1,000-square-foot extension to your home, as minor as replacing old carpet with new hardwood flooring or anything in between.

Using your home’s equity for home improvement projects is a smart choice for multiple reasons. For one, the money you put into the renovations acts as an investment. If you choose improvements that increase your home’s value, you can make back the money you spent or even see a return when you sell your home. Also, if you use the funds from a home equity loan to increase your home’s value, you may be able to deduct the interest paid on the loan from your taxes (be sure to consult with your tax adviser if you plan to go this route).

If you plan to use your home equity funds for home improvements, be sure to choose wisely. It’s best to go for improvements that add lasting value to your home instead of blowing big bucks on superficial remodeling projects that may look dated just a few years down the line.

2. Debt consolidation

Another popular use for a home equity loan is to consolidate high-interest debt. Paying off multiple debts at high interest rates can be cumbersome and difficult to manage. Worse, the heavy interest rates mean more of the borrower’s money goes toward the lender and less goes toward paying down the principal of the debts. Using a home equity loan to consolidate debt to a single and no-interest or low-interest loan can slash a pile of debt by several thousands of dollars and help shorten repayment time by several years.

3. College education

When interest rates are falling, funding a college education through a home equity loan instead of a high-interest student loan can be a smart choice. Similarly, homeowners struggling to meet their student debt payments without defaulting on the loan might want to use their home’s equity to pay off the debt quickly and replace it with a more manageable low-interest loan. It’s important to note that paying off a federal student loan with home equity might not be the best choice, as these loans are sometimes eligible for partial or complete forgiveness.

4. Emergency fund

Most of us know that financial experts recommend having three to six months’ worth of living expenses stashed in an emergency fund to be used if the need arises. But reality keeps this magical-sounding fund a distant dream for too many people. If you’ve been struggling to get your own emergency fund off the ground, tapping into your home’s equity can be a great way to get that boost you need. You’ll have a large stash of cash to build your fund, and the manageable payment plan will help ensure you put money into savings each month. As a bonus, if you experience a financial emergency of any kind after taking out your home equity loan, you’ll already have the funds on hand to help pull you through.

Before you take out a home equity loan

A home equity loan can provide homeowners with the funds they need for a home improvement project, to get their debt under control, pay for their college education or to build an emergency fund. However, before making either of these moves, it’s important to run the numbers so you are sure you can easily meet the regular loan payments. Otherwise, you risk defaulting on the loan and losing your home.

If you’re ready to take out a home equity loan, look no further than Advantage One Credit Union. Our rates and terms are always competitive. Give us a call at 734-676-7000 or stop by Advantage One Credit Union to get started on your loan application today.

* APR = Annual Percentage Rate and is valid as of [date].

Your Turn: How did you use the funds from your home equity loan? Tell us about it in the comments.

The Busy Budgeter

Rosemarie Groner knows what it’s like when your financial aspirations are in conflict with your personality. After all, she’s been there herself.

When Groner left her job as a state trooper to be a full-time mom, her family had spent its way into $30,000 of debt. By her own admission, most of her financial mess could be attributed to the family’s disorganized lifestyle.

“We spent a fortune in groceries,” she writes on her blog, “only to let them rot in the fridge when we got busy and had to eat out. Our sink was always piled high with dishes, making it hard to cook at home, and we tried everything to stop spending so much money only to fail time and time again.”

After lots of frustrating trial and error, Groner and her husband, Jon, finally discovered a strategy for organizing their lives and their finances and pulling themselves out of debt. Through her self-developed 90 Day Budget Bootcamp,  the Groners learned that budgeting and efficient home management cannot be separated. By focusing on improving home management, they successfully paid off $30,000-plus in debt and slashed the family’s annual spending by more than $23,000, all while finding a way to make up for the lost income upon leaving Rosemary Groner leaving her job.

When she had reached her goal, she was so ecstatic with her newly organized home, life and finances, that she launched a blog, The Busy Budgeter, to share all her newly discovered wisdom. The blog exploded and has been visited by 18 million readers since its launch in 2014. Through her insightful posts on all things financial, and her tried-and-true system for home and life organization, hundreds of thousands of followers have pulled themselves out of the paycheck-to-paycheck cycle and have started living financially responsible lives.

The Busy Budgeter focuses on organization and home management, and aids those who find it impossible to create a budget, track monthly expenses and stick to a spending plan. Through Rosemarie Groner’s innovative tips and strategies, the chronically disorganized can learn the secrets of successful home management and budgeting.

Blog visitors can choose from a wide variety of trending posts to read, like How to Play Pickleball: A Budget-Friendly Game and How to Quit a Job You Hate. Topics also include How to Budget; Organization; Easy Meals and Make Money. Tips and tricks are always presented in a down-to-earth language, making for easy reading and almost effortless implementation.

For visitors looking for more intensive training, the free 90 Day Budget Bootcamp is the perfect beginner’s guide toward organized living and budgeting. Participants receive a daily challenge to help them make small yet significant changes in their daily routines.

Groner also offers several paid courses to teach participants how to transform their homes and their budgets with organized, efficient systems.

As she says, “[T]here is absolutely nothing standing between you and a life with less stress, constant money wins instead of fails and a house that you’re excited to come home to.”

Do you want to be an outstanding homemaker and budgeter? Check out Groner’’s blog and follow her on Facebook and Twitter  to learn the Busy Budgeter’s secrets.

Your Turn: Are you a Busy Budgeter follower? Tell us in the comments how you’ve applied the advice in your own life.

Millennials Hit Hardest by Coronavirus Recession

The coronavirus recession hasn’t been easy on anyone, but millennials may have been hit hardest.

According to many economic experts, the 73 million millennials in the U.S. could experience financial setbacks from COVID-19 that have a longer-reaching impact than those experienced by any other age group.

Here’s why the coronavirus pandemic has been especially hard for those in 25- to 39-year-old age bracket.

Another recession for millennials

Economic recessions are nothing new for this demographic. They already lived through the Great Recession of 2008, and for many, the impact of the last recession is still being felt today.

The Great Recession hit millennials when they were still in college or just starting out on their career paths. For some, it meant the choices for their first post-college job were very slim. For others, it meant dropping out of college when there was no longer a guarantee of a degree netting them a higher-paying job. Regardless of how they were impacted, many millennials are still playing catch-up from the recession of 2008.

“For this cohort, already indebted and a step behind on the career ladder, this second pummeling could keep them from accruing the wealth of older generations,” says Gray Kimbrough, Washington, D.C. economist and American University professor.

Job losses across the board

More than 40 million workers in the U.S. have filed for unemployment since the beginning of the pandemic, but this is another area where millennials have been hit harder than most.

According to a recent report by Data for Progress, 52% of respondents under age 45 have lost jobs, been furloughed or had their work hours cut due to COVID-19. In contrast, just 26% of respondents over age 45 have suffered a job loss of some kind during the coronavirus pandemic.

Millions of millennials have lost jobs that are impossible to do while adhering to social distancing mandates. At the height of the economic lockdowns in April, the economy shed a staggering 20.5 million jobs. Of these jobs, 7.7 million were in the leisure and hospitality sector — a sector that is dominated by millennials. An additional 1.4 million lost jobs were in health care, primarily in ambulatory services — another field that employs a disproportionately large number of millennials.

No nest egg

Many millennials who are still on the rebound from the Great Recession are carrying piles of debt and have minimal savings — or none at all.

According to surveys conducted in 2018 by the Federal Reserve, 1 in 4 millennial families have a negative net worth, or debts that outweigh their assets. One in six millennials would not be able to find the funds to cover a $400 emergency. For these young employees, a relatively mild setback from the coronavirus can be devastating to their finances.

Millennials also tend to neglect their retirements. A recent report by the National Institute on Retirement Security found that 66% of millennials in the workforce have nothing put away for their retirement.

Can millennials recover?

Millennials had still not fully recovered from the Great Recession when the coronavirus pummeled the economy. They have shouldered a large share of job losses and have little or no savings to fall back on.

But there is hope. Millennials may not be as young as they were during the Great Recession, but they still have time to bounce back. They can use the unique challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic as an opportunity to reevaluate their career track and move onward toward a brighter future.

This age group, also known as Gen Y, is famous for its resilience and can-do attitude. They’ve gotten through the Great Recession of 2008 and they’ll beat the coronavirus recession, too. With hard work, perseverance and small steps toward a better future, millennials can pull themselves up and regain their financial health.

If you’re experiencing financial difficulties, we can help. Call, click or stop by Advantage One Credit Union to speak to a member service representative today.

Your Turn: Are you a millennial who has been impacted by the coronavirus recession? Tell us about it in the comments.

Learn More:
politicalwire.com
wsj.com
npr.org
investopedia.com
foxnews.com
wsj.com
cnbc.com

5 Online Resources for Autumn

Fall Foliage Prediction Map (website)
If you’re planning a road trip this autumn or just wondering when the foliage around you will hit its peak, you need to check out this map. The foliage prediction map uses statistical models to predict when the foliage will be most striking in every county in the country. It’s all you need to enjoy the best of fall.

Corn Mazes America (website)
What better way to spend a cool fall afternoon than by getting lost inside an enormous corn maze? This incredible website has taken all the guesswork out of corn mazes with its massive database of corn mazes from all around the country. You can browse corn mazes by state or town, find one on a map and download directions for easy travel. Corn Maze America will help you find the maze you need for an epic autumn adventure.

KOA (iOS) (Android)
Get ready for the camping trip of a lifetime! With its wide selection of campsites, complete with search tools, directions to each location with built-in navigation and several filter options for each search, the KOA (Kampgrounds of America) app will help you bring your fall camping trip to the next level. Many of the app’s features function offline as well, including campground information, search tools and driving directions, making the app the perfect accompaniment for a trip out into the deepest wilderness. The campgrounds await you!

BigOven (iOS) (Android)
The dwindling sunlight and falling temperatures of fall make it the perfect time of year to break out the mixing bowl and whip up some hearty homemade goodies. And if you need some tried-and-true recipes to make it happen, there’s an app for that! Download BigOven for access to more than a half-million recipes that will help you bring autumn into your kitchen. On the super-popular app, you’ll find the secret to making delectable pumpkin pie, butternut squash soup, mashed potatoes and gravy and so many other fall favorites. Don’t forget to check out the other fun features; like money-saving hacks for using up your leftovers, a grocery-shopping organizer and so much more.

LeafSnap (iOS) (Android)
Are you a genuine tree-hugger who always wants to learn more about the beautiful foliage around you? The info you need is just a download away! LeafSnap is a free app that can identify 90% of all known species of plants and trees. Just snap a photo of a leaf and the app will identify the kind of tree it came from in seconds. Your nature walks will never be the same!

Your Turn: What’s your favorite app for autumn? Tell us all about it in the comments!

Learn More:
imore.com
koa.com
plantidentifier.info
bigoven.com