Cash Money Life Blog Review

Cash money Life logoThe internet is saturated with blogs and sites about anything and everything under the sun. Among the dozens of blogs devoted to personal finance, Cash Money Life (cashmoneylife.com) stands out as a reliable and factual source of information and advice. As featured in top-tier media sites like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Yahoo! Finance, MSN Money and MainStreet.com, Cash Money Life offers readers an easy and efficient way to get the inside scoop on anything money-related without the distraction of complex interfaces and confusing designs.

Authored by Ryan Guina, the blog targets a broad audience and brands itself as a personal finance, small business and career journal. The site is updated daily with articles covering a wide spectrum of financial topics, from current events1 to product reviews, tutorials, investment tips and more. You can use the site to search for an auto insurance plan that suits your needs or to explore the stocks that are worth investing in this season. Articles are always written in simple, easy-to-understand language that offers concrete information without talking down to the reader.

Here are some trending articles on Cash Money Life:

  • How to Invest in Small Business
  • Best Auto Insurance Companies
  • Liberty Tax Review—Simplified Tax Filing
  • FreeTaxUSA Review—Step-By-Step Help Filing Your TaxesE-file Review—How the Software Can Streamline Your Taxes

When visiting the site, you can browse through the fresh posts or look up archived evergreen content covering a comprehensive list of financial topics.

Also check out the “Free Money” page, which is a wildly popular spot that is dedicated to sharing information about freebies. The freebies include gimmick-free, complimentary trials, referral bonuses, first-time-customer gift cards and more. Check it out to see what’s free this week!

If you’re looking for a place where you can find clear, practical, and reliable financial information, visit Cash Money Life today.

Your Turn:
What’s your favorite online source for financial information? Tell us all about it in the comments!

SOURCES:

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/money/top-10-highly-useful-websites-learn-about-personal-finance-for-free.html

https://cashmoneylife.com/blog/

https://cashmoneylife.com/blog/about

Mortgage Rates Are Dropping; Should I Refinance?

a young couple refinances their house at the credit unionQ: I’ve heard that mortgage rates have dropped dramatically since the start of 2019. Should I refinance my mortgage loan to take advantage of these lower rates?

A: Refinancing a mortgage is essentially paying off the remaining balance on an existing home loan and then taking out a new mortgage loan, often at a lower interest rate. It may sound like a no-brainer, but there are many factors to consider before moving forward with a refinance.

Is it a good time to refinance?
Mortgage rates have been falling steadily over the last few months. During the last week of March this year, rates took their biggest one-week nosedive in more than a decade, and mortgage applications rose 39%, as thousands of homeowners sought out their lenders for a refinance.

However, the downward trend has already reversed as of the beginning of April, when rates hit 4.29%. That’s up from 4.17% just one week prior. If you’re thinking of refinancing in the near future, it’s best to do move quickly so you can lock in the lowest possible rate. You may be able to save hundreds of dollars a month if you refinance a loan that currently has a relatively high interest rate.

Is a refinance right for you?
While this is definitely an excellent time to take out a new mortgage, that doesn’t mean a refinance is the right fit for everyone.

Here are two reasons a refinance might be a good fit for you:

  • Your credit is strong and you’d like to lower your monthly payments
    The first, and most obvious, reason homeowners refinance their mortgage is to take advantage of a lower interest rate. The drive behind this reason might be a change in finances, personal life or simply the desire to save money. As mentioned, the current mortgage rates make this an excellent time to refinance into a lower interest rate.

    Don’t try a refinance unless your credit is in good shape, though. Taking out another mortgage with a less-than-desirable credit score can mean getting hit with a high interest rate, even if national rates are dropping.

    Aside from reducing your monthly payments, a lower interest rate can also help you build more equity in your home sooner.

  • You’d like to shorten the life of your loan.
    People sometimes choose to refinance their mortgage because they want to finish paying off their loan sooner. If you have a mortgage that has a really high interest rate but you can easily meet these payments, consider refinancing into a shorter-term option. You may be able to pay off your loan in half the time without changing your monthly payment much at all

When refinancing your mortgage is a bad idea
In the following three circumstances, refinancing your mortgage may not make sense.

  • You’re in debt.
    If you’re looking for the extra stash of cash each month to pull you out of debt, you probably shouldn’t be refinancing. Most people who refinance for this reason end up spending all the money they save, and then some. Without making any real changes to your spending habits, giving yourself extra money is only enabling more debt. While the intention is rooted in sound logic, unless you make an equally sound change in your spending habits, you’ll be right back to your present situation in very little time.
  • A refinance will greatly lengthen the loan’s terms.
    If you’ve only got 10 years left on your mortgage and you want to refinance to stretch out those payments over 30 years, you won’t come out ahead. Any money you save on lower payments will be lost in the cost of the refinance and the extra 20 years of interest you’ll be paying on your mortgage.
  • You don’t plan on living in your home much longer.
    If you plan on moving within the next few years, the money you save might not even come close to the costs of a refinance.

How much will it cost?
Homeowners are often eager to get started on a refinance until they see what it will cost them.

Remember all those fees and closing costs you paid when you first bought your house? Prepare to pay most of them again. Broker fees will vary, but a typical refinance will cost anywhere between 3-6% of the loan’s principal.

Before proceeding with your refinance, make sure you’ll actually be saving money. You can do this by procuring a good faith estimate from several lenders. This will get you your projected interest rate and the anticipated loan price. Next, divide this price by the amount you’ll save each month with your anticipated new rate. This will give you the number of months that will have to pass before you break even on the new loan. If you don’t plan on staying in your home for that long, or you can’t afford to wait until then to recoup your losses, refinancing may not make sense for you.

Rates are still low, and if your finances are in good shape, a refinance can be a great way to put an extra few hundred dollars into your pocket each month. [If you’re ready to talk to a home loan expert about refinancing, call, click or stop by Advantage One today to ask about getting started on your refinance. We’re always happy to help you save money!]

Your Turn:
Have you refinanced? What drove your decision? Was it the right decision for you? Let us know in the comments!

SOURCES:

https://www.myfinance.com/5-reasons-to-refinance/?utm_source=Millennial+Money&utm_campaign=millennialmoneycru&utm_medium=mfCRU

https://www.consumersadvocate.org/mortgage-refinance/a/best-mortgage-refinance?matchtype=e&keyword=should%20i%20refinance&adpos=1t2&gclid=CjwKCAjww6XXBRByEiwAM-ZUILOeJrx3aTigcckJXeQcxYZ5KC-gPj1HDcbQYQlprrg3zX08LqGaohoCL14QAvD_BwE

https://www.investopedia.com/mortgage/refinance/when-and-when-not-to-refinance-mortgage/

https://www.investopedia.com/mortgage/refinance/7-bad-reasons-to-refinance-mortgage/

https://www.bankrate.com/mortgages/analysis/

https://www.wkbn.com/news/local-news/with-mortgage-rate-drop-many-buyers-consider-refinancing/1897961701

Beware Tech Support Scams

Closeup of man's hands using a smartphone with desk and keyboard in the backgroundThe FTC is warning of a surge in tech support scams, many of which can be difficult to spot.

In a recent widespread scam, a company calling itself Elite IT Partners, Inc., purchased keywords so it showed in searches for password recovery assistance. Victims contacted the “company,” which asked them to fill out an online form with their contact information. Scammers then called the victims, asking for remote access to their computers. Once inside, they used phony evidence to convince victims that their computers were in need of repairs requiring pricey software. The scammers accepted payment for this software, but did not provide it.

Tech support scams don’t always follow the above script. Here are two other common scenarios:

1. Phone calls
In this variation, scammers spoof the numbers of well-known companies claiming they’ve found a problem with the victim’s computer. They’ll ask for remote access to it, run a “diagnostic test,” and plant bogus problems. They’ll then ask the victim to pay an exorbitant amount of money to get the issue fixed.

Red flag: Legitimate tech-support companies will never initiate contact by phone.

2. Pop-up warnings
Sometimes, a tech-support scammer will target victims with an alarming pop-up warning. The pop-up might look like a legitimate error from the victim’s system or antivirus software. The message will warn about a computer security issue and instruct the victim to call a listed number. Once the victim calls, they’ll be asked to grant the scammer remote access to their computer. The scam will then proceed much like what’s described above.

Red flag: Legitimate security warnings from tech companies will never ask you to call a phone number.

If you’ve been scammed
Are you a victim of a tech-support scam? It may not be too late to reclaim your money.

If you paid via credit or debit card, you may be able to stop the transaction. Contact your credit card company or [credit union] about contesting the charge.

You’ll also want to update your computer’s security software and run a scan. Delete anything your computer identifies as a security issue. Be sure to change your usernames and passwords as well.

Finally, don’t forget to report your scam to the FTC.

Your Turn: Have you been targeted by a tech-support scam? Tell us about it in the comments.

SOURCES:
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2019/03/keep-tech-support-strangers-out-your-computer

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4013405/windows-protect-from-tech-support-scams

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-spot-avoid-and-report-tech-support-scams

Step 4 of 12 Toward A Debt-Free Life: Create An Emergency Fund

Young caucasian woman working at modern deskYou may be feeling impatient to start more aggressively paying down debt, but it’s important to first create an emergency fund. If you don’t have money socked away for unexpected expenses, you’ll be tempted to use the money that’s already earmarked for your debt payments to fund this expense.

Experts recommend keeping three months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund, but you can start with a modest $1,000. Set up an automatic monthly or weekly transfer from your [credit union] Checking Account to your Savings Account until you have a fully padded emergency fund. This may take several months, but no worries, you can continue following the next few steps towards a debt-free life as your emergency fund grows.

Your Turn:
Why do you think it’s so important to have an emergency fund? Share your thoughts with us in the comments.

8 Ways To Spot A Job Scam

Young woman looks at a job sheet while verifying information on her smartphone.If you’re in the market for a new job, or you’re looking for extra part-time work, be careful. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is warning of a surge in employment scams of every kind. Victims might have their accounts emptied, their identities stolen, or they may even find themselves facing jail time for money laundering charges.

Protect yourself from employment scams by holding up any job you’re considering against this list of red flags:

1.) The job pays very well for easy work
If a job description offers a high hourly rate for non-skilled work with no experience necessary, you can assume it’s a scam. Legitimate companies will not overpay for work that anyone can do. Carefully read the wording of the job pitch. If the deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

2.) The job description is poorly written
Scrutinize every word of the job description. If it’s riddled with typos and spelling mistakes, you’re looking at a scam.

3.) They need to hire you NOW!
If a “business” claims the position needs to be immediately filled and they’re ready for you to start working today, assume it’s a scam. Most legitimate businesses will need time to process your application, properly interview you and determine if you are indeed a good fit.

4.) The business has no traceable street address or real online presence
If you’ve spotted a position on an online job board, your first step should be researching the company. Google the company name to see what the internet has to say about them. If you suspect a scam, search the name with words like “scam” and “fraud” in the search string. Look for a brick-and-mortar address, a phone number and a real online presence. If all you find are help-wanted ads and a P.O. Box, move on to better job leads.

5.) You need to share sensitive information just to apply
Does the “job application” you’re looking at seek sensitive details, like your Social Security number and/or a checking account number? Such information should not be necessary just to submit an application. You might even be innocently asked to share details you think are minor, like your date of birth, name of your hometown, first pet’s name or your mother’s maiden name. Of course, these are all keys to open up access to your passwords and/or PINs.

There’s no surer sign you’re dealing with crooks than being asked to share information that practically guarantees you’ll be scammed.

6.) You need to pay a steep fee to apply
Some legitimate companies charge a nominal application fee for hopeful employees. However, if the fee is absurdly high, or the company asks you to cash a check for them and then refund it, you’re being scammed.

7.) There’s no business email
Some job scammers will impersonate well-known companies to look authentic. For example, you might think you’re applying to an off-site job at Microsoft. You’ll be told to email your resume to JohnSmithMicrosoftHR@gmail.com. Your red flag here is the email address: The domain is generic. If the “recruiter” genuinely represented Microsoft, the email address would be something like JohnSmith@HR.Microsoft.com.

8.) The “recruiter” found your resume on a job board you never use
If the “recruiter” claims they’ve picked up your resume on a job board you don’t remember visiting, it’s not your memory failing you. Job-scammers often scrape victims’ personal details off the internet and then pretend to have received a resume. They’ll know you’re looking for a job, and they’ll know enough about you to convince you they’ve got your resume, but it’s all a scam. If someone contacts you about a position you’ve never applied for, or claims to have found your resume on a job board you’ve never visited, run the other way!

As always, practice caution when online. Keep your browser updated and strengthen the privacy settings on your social media accounts. When engaged in a public forum, don’t share information that can make you vulnerable, like your exact birthdate or employment history. Never wire money to people you don’t know well or agree to cash a stranger’s check in exchange for a commission. Above all, keep your guard up when online and use common sense: When in doubt, opt out!

Your Turn:
Have you been targeted by a job scam? Tell us about it in the comments, below!

SOURCES:
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts

https://www.job-hunt.org/onlinejobsearchguide/job-search-scams.shtml

https://www.whatismybrowser.com/guides/how-to-be-safe-online/why-should-i-update-my-web-browser

Four Apps To Help You Master Your Spring Cleaning

Our Home logo1. OurHome
If your kids are old enough to do their part in making your home spotlessly clean, you need to download this free app. OurHome makes sharing spring cleaning chores easy! You can assign tasks to your kids, set deadlines for when you want jobs done and reward your kids with points once they’ve completed a chore. Let your kids cash in their points for their reward of choice, like a new toy, a trip to an amusement park or even a cost-free privilege, like choosing the family’s dinner menu for a week.

Sync every family member’s device with your OurHome app to unlock its full power. You’ll be able to send messages to your kids, check up on their progress and set helpful chore reminders.

 

Snupps logo2. Snupps
Spring-cleaning your way through your house gives you the perfect opportunity to take stock of everything you own. The Snupps app makes it easy. You can upload pictures of every item in your home, create virtual shelves on the app and organize your stuff by category. Plus, you can make money while spring cleaning by selling any item you don’t need through the app. It’s like selling your stuff in a virtual yard sale!

 

Home Routines logo3. Home Routines
Do you find it overwhelming to keep track of all you need to clean? Home Routines makes it simple! For a one-time $5 fee, you can download the app and start organizing your chores. Create detailed checklists, assign tasks to days of the week and set alerts to remind you what needs to get done. From there, you’ll be able to easily track your progress. And, if you need more motivation, set the in-app timer and try to beat your own goal.

The app divides your cleaning lists into Focus Zones. You can customize this feature by adding rooms and chores to each zone. Then, choose a different zone for each day or have a zone appear only once a month. You can also set the app to remind you to complete specific tasks or clean certain zones at predetermined times. For example, you can have the app remind you to scrub the counters each night, wash the windows every other week and dust your light fixtures once a month.

 

Do! logo4. Do!
If you like to have a good, old-fashioned, paper to-do list, you’ll love this app. Do! gives you the look and feel of a paper list with realistic paper and pen sound effects. You can easily view your list and even download a widget to your device for seeing the day’s tasks at a glance. Use the app’s color-coding system to keep things organized and check off tasks as you go. The app is free with an in-app purchase and just $1.99 for the premium, ad-free version.

Let these super-convenient apps help you make your home shine this spring.

Your Turn:
What’s your favorite spring cleaning app? Tell us about it in the comments!

SOURCES:

https://en.softonic.com/solutions/what-are-the-best-apps-for-spring-cleaning

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnet.com/google-amp/news/best-apps-to-help-prepare-for-spring-cleaning-2019/

https://www.lifewire.com/best-house-cleaning-apps-4587232

Simple tips for protecting your parents from financial fraud

daughter helping elderly father check his account onlineAccording to the Federal Trade Commission, older adults are disproportionately affected by fraud.

Whether it’s a phony phone call, phishing scam, or mail fraud, seniors often become targets for scammers who perceive them as easy marks.

While you alone can’t put an end to this shady illegal activity, you can empower you parents with the knowledge to keep themselves—and their finances—safe.

Remind them about “stranger danger”
Your parents probably taught you the concept of “stranger danger” at an early age—and for good reason. Don’t interact with suspicious people. It’s an important lesson that’s relevant to adults as well as children.

If someone you don’t know asks for personal information, it’s probably a scam. Remind your parents to never give out credit card or account information, passwords, or social security numbers unless they can verify the identity of the person or business making the request.

Add their number to the Do Not Call List
When you add your phone number to the The National Do Not Call Registry, the government informs telemarketers not to call you.

Unfortunately, unscrupulous organizations and scammers ignore the registry and may continue to harass your parents, but they should see a reduction in unsolicited calls and text messages from those who abide by the law.

Give them a crash course in online literacy
If your senior parents use technology but aren’t completely familiar with how scams work online, they might not understand what to click and what to avoid.

Spend some time going over how to navigate the internet safely. Most importantly, explain email phishing. Emphasize that they should never click links in unsolicited emails from people or companies they don’t know.

If they use social networks like Facebook, warn them not to share anything too personal as scammers might use this information to impersonate friends or family members online.

Used with permission. © 2019 BALANCE. All rights reserved.